It: Chapter Two (2019, dir. Andy Muschetti)

The now-adult Losers’ Club return to Derry to face Pennywise again 27 years later. Oddly baggy second half; the adults don’t get enough attention, and the resolution still doesn’t work. Pennywise turns out to be a lot less scary when facing down grownups. Gives the impression there’s a better miniseries-length edit of the movies somewhere.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (2019, dir. Andre Ovredal)

One Halloween, a gang of geeky teens disturb a fabled local ghost. Starts well, but soon gets bogged down in undernourished anthology stories and a pedestrian puzzle seen a hundred times before. Interesting late 60s setting, though never made relevant to the narrative.

Assassination Nation (2018, dir. Sam Levinson)

Four high school girls are targeted by a vigilante posse after a data hack tears a town apart. Stylish and confident Trump-era satire, equal parts The Purge sequels and God Bless America. More set-up than an actual fully-fledged movie, this nevertheless has lots to recommend it if you go with it.

Angel Has Fallen (2019, dir. Ric Roman Waugh)

A veteran secret service agent goes on the run after he’s framed for a presidential assassination attempt. Third and best of the Gerry Butler actioners, this is reliable thick ear entertainment with some quality villainy from Danny Huston, and some excellent stuntwork (tho some iffy lighting of greenscreen studio space). Fun while it’s on.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s twopenceworth.

Crawl (2019, dir. Alexandre Aja)

A student and her estranged father are trapped in a house full of alligators during a hurricane. A tense and fun single-location horror thriller that makes the most of its excellent effects and actors, wringing every last sliver of tension from its gleefully B-movie premise. Recommended.

Star Wars: Empire of Dreams (2004, dir. Edith Becker & Kevin Burns)

An uncritical though still fascinating documentary on the development and making of the original Star Wars trilogy, focusing on production problems with the first film. Plenty of detail here for fans. Though many of these stories have been often-told, they’re collected here in an engaging way. Fun for completists.

Slender Man (2018, dir. Sylvain White)

Four teenagers invite an urban legend into their lives; disappearances soon begin. Autumnal and muted horror flick based on the meme character. A couple of OK performances and some directorial moments aside, there’s nothing here that hasn’t been done a hundred times before, and often better.