Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019, dir. Michael Dougherty)

The Russells and others fight the emerging Titans; and work to support Godzilla. Decent if slightly over-serious continuation of the 2014 rebooted cycle with a canny cast of character actors and a genuine sense of the spectacular. Light on story, but heavy on Kyle Chandler reaction shots, plus monster-fu aplenty.

Cat People (1942, dir. Jacques Tourneur)

A Serbian woman in New York fears she cannot love because of an ancient curse. Tremendous noir/horror hybrid, taking inspiration from werewolf archetypes. Huge amounts of fun, breathtaking in its economy, and with some great suspense set-pieces. Highly recommended. A sequel – The Curse of the Cat People – followed in 1944.

Hellboy (2019, dir. Neil Marshall)

Hellboy battles an ancient sorceress from Arthurian legend. Famously-troubled shooting and post-production bedevilled this fantasy horror series reboot, which as a consequence is all over the place. Some good stuff, but its awkward storytelling is patched with flashbacks, dubbed dialogue, variable FX, overlength; the works. A shame.

Scrooged (1988, dir. Richard Donner)

A mean TV executive is visited by a series of ghosts intent on teaching him the true meaning of Christmas. A raucous, overlong, and often unfunny retelling of A Christmas Carol, overly keen to cash in on its star’s links to Ghostbusters. Inevitably, some bits work nevertheless, and the film’s become something of a Yuletide perennial despite its weaknesses.

Ghostbusters (1984, dir. Ivan Reitman)

A trio of disgraced academics working on the paranormal turn to the private sector. Still-effective horror-comedy balancing New York snark, slapstick, and Lovecraftian interdimensional terror. Great city cinematography, and some lovely delicate moments to counterbalance the widescreen mayhem. Both sequel and reboot followed.

The Frighteners (1996, dir. Peter Jackson)

A conman psychic who can see the dead has to confront an undead serial killer. Fast, funny and inventive supernatural comedy, with a great central performance from Fox and still-effective (and then-groundbreaking) CG effects work.

In The Tall Grass (2019, dir. Vincenzo Natali)

A pregnant woman and her brother are lured into a field of tall grass. This expansion of the Stephen King/Joe Hill novella begins well, but unravels when fresh material is introduced. Intriguing hints in the original are under-explored, and what’s new confuses rather than deepens. A disappointment, not least from this talented writer/director.