Sunshine (2007, dir. Danny Boyle)

A last-ditch effort to restart the Sun through deploying a nuclear device goes awry. Handsome though derivative SF that can’t decide if it’s an arthouse piece or a mainstream thriller. In trying to be both, and in quoting from Alien, 2001, 2010, Silent Running, Event Horizon, Dark Star and others along the way, it struggles for clarity and distinctiveness.

Mayhem (2017, dir. Joe Lynch)

A rage virus infects a corporate HQ; a lowly just-sacked worker and a mortgage client fight their way to the boardroom. Gleeful horror-comedy with some straightforward points to make about capitalism and workplace culture. Splattery lo-fi fun, with good leads and solid direction helping out no end.

Charlie’s Angels (2019, dir. Elizabeth Banks)

A young programmer teams up with an elite security agency to retrieve a valuable energy device. OK series continuation that does precisely what you’d expect with no surprises whatsoever. Passable while it’s on; its best jokes are in the end credits, though.

Vivarium (2019, dir. Lorcan Finnegan)

A young couple is trapped in a show home on a maze-like estate. Absurdist SF horror piece that’s well-designed and well-acted but doesn’t have anywhere to go; this may well be the point, but the film makes this (riffing on Blue Velvet) in its opening titles. 90-odd minutes might be too much of a thing for some.

Tron: Legacy (2010, dir. Joseph Kosinski)

Thirty years later, Flynn’s son is scanned into the same computer universe his long-missing father found in the first film. Well-designed and with a super techno/disco soundtrack, this is a po-faced mess that can’t even sustain the daft people-as-programs conceit of its predecessor. Dull and overlong, though with OK support from a glam Michael Sheen.

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Tron (1982, dir. Steven Lisberger)

A hacker is scanned into his former employer’s computer network; a parallel world awaits. Odd SF/fantasy mashing up evil tech corps and voguish videogames. Simplistic and weird, with some still-stunning design and a cool mix of early CG, traditional animation, and David Warner doing his best. A sequel followed in 2010.

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker [AKA Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker] (2019, dir. JJ Abrams)

Forces align for a last battle between the resistance fighters and the Empire to prevent a Palpatine victory. Patchy finale to the nine-film arc which, despite stirring stuff, plus effective comic moments and detail, fails to convince in its lack of climactic story and its course-correction rewriting of the previous movie. A shame, as the new crew have earned some affection.