Rabid (2019, dir. Jen Soska & Sylvia Soska [AKA The Soska Sisters])

A struggling fashion designer receives an experimental skin graft; she becomes patient zero of a rabies-like epidemic. Uneven but watchable remake of the 1977 David Cronenberg movie (with nods to others). Lots of ideas and directions tried, though not all are followed through; some pleasingly weird moments tho.

Child’s Play (2019, dir. Lars Klevberg)

A smart-tech doll is reprogrammed to malfunction; it develops homicidal tendencies. Generally solid update/reboot of the series with a sense of the daftness of the premise. Works better in the moment than in retrospect, but nasty fun nevertheless, plus a couple of satirical touches.

Terminator: Dark Fate (2019 Dir. Tim Miller)

Jump sequel to T2. Similar story but Terminators from a new future now trying to kill someone else of future importance. Welcome return to form with this. Mind blowing VFX coupled with a good script and actors enjoying themselves. Enjoyable!

Godzilla (2014, dir. Gareth Edwards)

Earth is threatened by MUTOs (massive unidentified terrestrial organisms), awoken by human nuclear activity. Superior monster mayhem anchored by a fabulous visual sensibility, and by a genuine feeling of otherness between the creatures and us. Story-light, and a touch serious, but properly spectacular, nevertheless. Sequels ensued.

Deepstar Six (1988, dir. Sean S. Cunningham)

An undersea naval facility disturbs a monstrous sea creature. Slightly tatty Alien clone trying to steal The Abyss‘s thunder at the late 80s box office. A cast of TV faces and some fun-though-budget model and creature effects help pass the time. One great jumpscare, mind you, and some interesting character details in passing.

Leviathan (1989, dir. George Pan Cosmatos)

A deep-sea mining team encounters a sunken Soviet ship harbouring a mutant organism. Cheesy Alien/The Thing hybrid/ripoff, made to piggyback the release of The Abyss. Perfunctory direction and script, but a couple of neat Stan Winston-designed monster moments and a fine cast of character actors offer some entertainment.

Krull (1983, dir. Peter Yates)

A prince has to rescue a princess to save their world. Oddball SF/fantasy hybrid, riffing on a hundred different fairy tales and genre tropes. Its quest narrative/road movie structure means that it’s inevitably patchy; some dark ideas intrude, though the imagination and budget available are ill-matched, and it’s tonally all over the place.