Men In Black (1997, dir. Barry Sonnenfeld)

An NYPD cop is recruited into a secret anti-alien taskforce. Brisk SF comedy-thriller with some good moments and neat odd-couple playing from its leads, but too concerned with sub-Ghost Busters slapstick than with exploring the potential of its premise.

Escape From New York (1981, dir. John Carpenter)

An infamous criminal is sent into the island prison of Manhattan to rescue the US President. Defiantly odd post-apocalyptic piece, much happier with its production design and oddball characters than delivering on action/horror. Not quite the film you remember.

War for the Planet of the Apes (2017, dir. Matt Reeves)

Caesar comes up against a military leader determined to wipe apes from the planet. Downbeat but impressive third and final part of the trilogy; a more introspective movie than its predecessors but stirring nevertheless.

Another opinion? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s review.

The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997, dir, Steven Spielberg)

A rescue mission to a second island – where the original film’s dinosaurs were engineered – goes awry. Patchy sequel to the original, stronger on set-pieces than on logic or story, with borrowings from a dozen monster movies.

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2017, dir. Luc Besson)

Two elite agents work to uncover a dark secret at the heart of a gigantic space station. Clunkily-scripted and unevenly-acted but undeniably spectacular and well-designed SF fantasy; a $200m auteur piece, for good or ill, and all the better for its distinctiveness.

Another view? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s thoughts.

Blade Runner 2049 (2017, dir. Denis Villeneuve)

A replicant assassin uncovers a decades-old conspiracy. A worthy follow-up to the Ridley Scott classic; 2049 is deliberately-paced, but stunning in places and gorgeous to look at throughout. Recommended.

Fancy another 255 opinion? Here’s Xussia’s take.

The Relic (1996, dir. Peter Hyams)

An ancient creature is let loose in a Chicago museum. Fun SF/horror monster movie with its tongue in its cheek, supported by good casting and by director Hyams’ great cinematography. No classic, but a good job well done.