Creepshow 2 (1987, dir. Michael Gornick)

Three adaptations of Stephen King short stories: “Old Chief Woodenhead”, “The Raft” and “The Hitchhiker”. Cut-price anthology sequel that short-changes the viewer (there were five tales in Part 1), making up in rubbery gore for what the yarns lack in comedy and chills. A couple of oddly-effective moments, but that’s about it.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (2019, dir. Andre Ovredal)

One Halloween, a gang of geeky teens disturb a fabled local ghost. Starts well, but soon gets bogged down in undernourished anthology stories and a pedestrian puzzle seen a hundred times before. Interesting late 60s setting, though never made relevant to the narrative.

Ghost Stories (2017, dir. Andy Nyman & Jeremy Dyson)

A paranormal investigator is given three cases to solve which will apparently prove the existence of the afterlife. Hugely entertaining and clever reworking of old-as-the-hills material, perhaps better enjoyed on a second viewing so its construction can be appreciated.

For another perspective, here’s Xussia’s view.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen)

Six tales of the Old West, each taller than the last. Splendid Western anthology, packed full of quirky moments and character actors, with a few stars plainly having fun. Not exactly commercial, though; Netflix is a good home for this Coen brothers confection.

Patient Seven (2016, dir. Danny Draven and others)

A researcher discusses six notable patients in the same mental hospital. OK horror anthology with some reasonable production values and decent story quality, though the final twist is supremely guessable.

A Christmas Horror Story (2015, dir. Grant Harvey, Steven Hoban & Brett Sullivan)

Four linked horror stories take place on the same Christmas Eve. Reasonable anthology held together by William Shatner’s drunk radio jock. Plenty of contemporary horror tropes dealt with: changelings, zombies, Krampus, spooky dormitory found-footage.

Dr Terror’s House of Horrors (1965, dir. Freddie Francis)

Five men on a train have their fortunes told by the mysterious Dr Schreck. The first Amicus horror anthology is tremendous, mixing classic tropes with modish 60s pop culture, delivering a suite of chills and thrills backed up by expert playing from an unparalleled ensemble cast.