Frozen II (2019, dir. Chris Buck & Jennifer Lee)

Elsa and Anna have to leave Arendelle to find out the secret of Elsa’s powers and their family history. Overly-complicated sequel with OK though derivative songs, and reliance on goodwill from Part I to see things through. Some good moments, but second time around, this is no classic.

Zombieland: Double Tap (2019, dir. Ruben Fleischer)

Ten years after the events of Zombieland; tensions split the group, but new threats emerge.  Horror-comedy z-sequel that offers pretty much the same as before, though with inevitably diminished returns. Fine for those who liked the first one, though there’s little here for anyone else.

Terminator: Dark Fate (2019, dir. Tim Miller)

A young woman is targeted for termination; an augmented soldier is sent as a protector. This alt-timeline sequel (ignoring all but the first two films) is for series fans only. Some OK action, nice ideas and good jokes, but no purpose, some handwavey plotting, and too much weightless CG tomfoolery instead of grounded mayhem.

Here’s another review.

Brahms: The Boy II (2020, dir. William Brent Bell)

A family recovering from trauma rent a rural property on the grounds where a tragedy occurred. Predictable bloodless jumpscare sequel that struggles to reconfigure its villain, rules and premise from Part I. The dependable Ralph Ineson glowers in support as a gamekeeper.

Annabelle Comes Home (2019, dir. Gary Dauberman)

Babysitters working for The Warrens meddle with cursed artefacts, summoning a range of demonic entities. Okay series entry/sequel working to tie together the convoluted Conjuring franchise; slight on story, but some effective jumps, neat period details, and an appealing cast.

Jay and Silent Bob Reboot (2019, dir. Kevin Smith)

Jay and Silent Bob take another road trip to Hollywood to stop a remake of a movie about their lives being completed. Sequel/reprise of 2001’s … Strike Back, with more cameos, callouts to other Askewniverse movies, and to fan culture more generally. Fans only, inevitably, but there’s some heart and a couple of decent jokes and neat obscurities among the references.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 (2010, dir. David Yates)

Harry and friends, now on the run, must destroy the magical items sustaining Voldemort. The first half of the final novel – more or less – is a decent chase adventure, with a darker tone than before; the splitting of the source material allows for pacing to be improved, through the structure necessitates a forced cliffhanger bridge to Part 2.