Fear Street: 1978 [AKA Fear Street Part Two: 1978] (2021, dir. Leigh Janiak)

Young adult counsellors at a summer camp are targeted by one of their number who becomes possessed by a vengeful witch. Patchy middle instalment of the horror trilogy, awkwardly juxtaposing slasher pastiche with larger-scale storytelling. Makes the mistake of not grounding its horrors: good playing can’t disguise structural issues and some stupid ideas.

Here’s the trailer.

Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970, dir. Peter Sasdy)

Three debauched Victorian gentlemen agree to a satanic ritual. Middling series entry (following directly from Dracula Has Risen From The Grave) balancing Stoker and Dennis Wheatley. Slipshod storytelling and a struggle to innovate doesn’t help, though the movie’s enlivened by a decent cast of character actors and some new talent.

Here’s the trailer.

C.H.U.D. II: Bud the C.H.U.D. (1989, dir. David Irving)

Teenagers steal a cadaver, and unwittingly cause a zombie outbreak. Generally sprightly loose sequel, played squarely for laughs this time out. A surprising amount of it works, even if the loose plot is little more than a frame for gag sequences. Contains one of the few John Huston jokes in horror cinema.

Here’s the trailer.

Welcome to Sudden Death (2020, dir. Dallas Jackson)

An ex-forces security guard takes on hi-tech thieves during a basketball game. Straightforward DTV reprise of the 1995 Peter Hyams/Van Damme minor action classic: Michael Jai White is as charismatic as ever, and while the movie’s not great, it delivers lo-fi fisticuffs, some OK jokes, and a couple of neat ideas.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn VI [AKA Wrong Turn 6: Last Resort] (2014, dir. Valeri Milev)

A young man and his friends arrive at a remote spa hotel: he has inherited the property, but it comes with family complications. A partial reboot that tries a few new things, though soon defaults to the boobs, blood, and inbreeds usual. A further reboot is promised for 2021.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn 4: Bloody Beginnings (2011, dir. Declan O’Brien)

Students on a ski vacation shelter in an abandoned asylum, where cannibal inbreeds lurk. Part 4 is a prequel, and improves on its predecessor, though interchangeable characters means that it’s hard to invest in their largely-splattery fates, which riff on Slumber Party Massacre in places.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn 3: Left for Dead (2009, dir. Declan O’Brien)

Kayakers plus prison officers transporting convicts fall foul of a pair of hunting cannibals. Tatty low-budget threequel with a mainly Brit cast playing West Virginia via Bulgaria. Some moments of verve (Tamar Hassan is a fun baddie) but more careful writing and direction is needed. Three more instalments followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn 2: Dead End (2007, dir. Joe Lynch)

The cast and crew of a forest survival reality TV show come up against inbred backwoods cannibals. Gleeful superior sequel which takes care to build on the original’s slim storyline, adding texture and nuance as well as buckets of blood. Clever direction, scripting and a touch of grand guignol combine to pleasing effect.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween: Resurrection (2002, dir. Rick Rosenthal)

Students spend Halloween night in the Myers house as part of a live-streamed event. None-more-early-00s direct sequel to H20. While the early internet/surveillance stuff is now interesting/nostalgic, this is poor even by franchise standards: one kill, though, references Peeping Tom.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween H20: Twenty Years Later (1998, dir. Steve Miner)

Two decades after the original killings Laurie Strode must face Michael again. Ignoring all but parts 1 and 2, this post-Scream series revival is a competent, well-produced (and brisk) entry with knowing touches, though it struggles to balance teen soap operatics with a more interesting story of survivor guilt, alcoholism and catharsis.

Here’s the trailer.