The Craft: Legacy [AKA Blumhouse’s The Craft: Legacy] (2020, dir. Zoe Lister-Jones)

A teenager moves with her mother to a new town and a new step-family, and finds she has latent magical powers. Belated sequel to The Craft that has some fun with the high school witch stuff, but which struggles to settle down and tell a story, though there’s a couple of nice moments along the way.

Here’s the trailer.

Urban Legends: Bloody Mary (2005, dir. Mary Lambert)

Students inadvertently conjure the spirit of a murdered alumnus: deaths ensue. DTV threequel taking a supernatural revenge rather than a whodunnit route. While thieving from multiple genre properties (including a kill lifted from Final Destination 2) there’s some agreeably gruesome moments, plus early appearances from Kate and Rooney Mara.

Here’s the trailer.

Friday the 13th (2009, dir. Marcus Nispel)

Two groups of students spend weekends by a deserted summer camp; murders ensue. Clunky attempted series reboot/sidequel with perfunctory handling, and a focus on hunk/hottie/stoner soap operatics rather than story or logic. Not much good, to be honest.

Here’s the trailer.

Mr Bean’s Holiday (2007, dir. Steve Bendelack)

Mr Bean wins a holiday to the French Riviera, but has trouble getting there. Superior road movie sequel that starts slowly but gains momentum. Slapstick, sight gags, some deft movie industry satire, plus a genuinely heart-warming climax.

Here’s the trailer:

The Babysitter: Killer Queen (2020, dir. McG [Joseph McGinty])

Two years after the traumatic events of the first film, Judah finds himself still struggling to be believed. Zippy sequel that expands on, rather than rehashes, its predecessor (which it’d be useful to see immediately prior). More gore slapstick than horror flick, this is a fun and pleasantly inconsequential ride.

Here’s the trailer.

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2015, dir. John Madden)

Sonny and Sunaina are to be married, but complications arise when an expansion plan is threatened. With the hotel residents’ stories pretty much told in the first movie, this sequel struggles to justify itself, lifting instead the plot of a Fawlty Towers episode. Still, fans won’t complain, plus Richard Gere twinkles in support.

A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon (2019, dir. Richard Phelan & Will Becher)

A stranded alien causes havoc at Mossy Bottom Farm. Aardman does ET, basically. And pretty well, too. This second Shaun movie is gorgeous-looking, as English as tuppence, has a high gag-to-minute ratio, and enough genre shout-outs to please the most demanding of SF faithful. The best flick of its type since, oh, Paddington 2.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (2019, dir. Joachim Ronning)

Aurora and Phillip are to be wed; but war between humans and fairy folk is threatened. Plodding sequel that substitutes mythos expansion for story. The chief fresh inspiration plundered here is Avatar, of all things. A decent cast does what it can with the material provided, but this is a franchise-killer.

Slumber Party Massacre II (1987, dir. Deborah Brock)

A survivor of a mass murder hallucinates during a break with bandmate friends. Shifting from the slasher template to ape now-voguish Elm St-derived dream logic (and Trick or Treat‘s rock focus), this semi-spoof sequel takes forever to get going, and isn’t good when it does, one great stunt aside. The fourth-wall-breaking villain gets a song, though.

The Secret Life of Pets 2 (2019, dir. Chris Renaud & Jonathan del Val)

Dog Max’s family gains a child; elsewhere, there’s a zoo tiger to rescue. Episodic and somewhat contrived sequel that delivers in some scenes, but which doesn’t hang together as a movie. Some sharper jokes this time out though, and both a lovely chase climax and a lesson learned for our protagonist.