Wrong Turn VI [AKA Wrong Turn 6: Last Resort] (2014, dir. Valeri Milev)

A young man and his friends arrive at a remote spa hotel: he has inherited the property, but it comes with family complications. A partial reboot that tries a few new things, though soon defaults to the boobs, blood, and inbreeds usual. A further reboot is promised for 2021.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn 4: Bloody Beginnings (2011, dir. Declan O’Brien)

Students on a ski vacation shelter in an abandoned asylum, where cannibal inbreeds lurk. Part 4 is a prequel, and improves on its predecessor, though interchangeable characters means that it’s hard to invest in their largely-splattery fates, which riff on Slumber Party Massacre in places.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn 3: Left for Dead (2009, dir. Declan O’Brien)

Kayakers plus prison officers transporting convicts fall foul of a pair of hunting cannibals. Tatty low-budget threequel with a mainly Brit cast playing West Virginia via Bulgaria. Some moments of verve (Tamar Hassan is a fun baddie) but more careful writing and direction is needed. Three more instalments followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn 2: Dead End (2007, dir. Joe Lynch)

The cast and crew of a forest survival reality TV show come up against inbred backwoods cannibals. Gleeful superior sequel which takes care to build on the original’s slim storyline, adding texture and nuance as well as buckets of blood. Clever direction, scripting and a touch of grand guignol combine to pleasing effect.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween: Resurrection (2002, dir. Rick Rosenthal)

Students spend Halloween night in the Myers house as part of a live-streamed event. None-more-early-00s direct sequel to H20. While the early internet/surveillance stuff is now interesting/nostalgic, this is poor even by franchise standards: one kill, though, references Peeping Tom.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween H20: Twenty Years Later (1998, dir. Steve Miner)

Two decades after the original killings Laurie Strode must face Michael again. Ignoring all but parts 1 and 2, this post-Scream series revival is a competent, well-produced (and brisk) entry with knowing touches, though it struggles to balance teen soap operatics with a more interesting story of survivor guilt, alcoholism and catharsis.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers [AKA Halloween 6] (1995, dir. Joe Chapelle)

Michael’s niece has a child: the baby is at the centre of a cult’s attempts to harness the energies compelling Michael Myers. Some distance from the linear plotting of the first films, this conclusion to the arc begun in Part 4 is soapy, scrappy, scattershot: only for indulgent series and Paul Rudd completists.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988, dir. Dwight H Little)

A decade after the events of Parts 1 and 2, Michael Myers escapes again, and returns to Haddonfield once more. Contrived series continuation that, despite some good moments and stunt work, has to rely on soap operatics for a story engine. Still, fun for fans, plus the ending has some verve.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween II (1981, dir. Rick Rosenthal)

A young woman continues to be stalked by an implacable killer. Straightforward slasher sequel (albeit with some very effective moments) continuing directly from the superior 1978 original. Has to work hard to justify itself: soap and mythic elements intrude in lieu of story/that much for Jamie Lee Curtis to do.

Here’s the trailer.

Black Water: Abyss (2020, dir. Andrew Traucki)

Cavers are trapped by underwater flooding and the presence of a man-eating giant crocodile. Straightforward explorers-in-peril horror (following 2007’s Black Water) that doesn’t really add much to the subgenre. Soapy interludes pass for character development between attacks/kills.

Here’s the trailer.