Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003, dir. Jonathan Mostow)

John Connor, now a troubled young adult, is again pursued (and protected) by machines from the future. A slightly tongue-in-cheek threequel – apart from the pleasantly downbeat ending – which is heavy on chase-based action, though light on violence and plot. It’s entertaining enough, if a step down from its predecessors.

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (2013, dir. Don Scardino)

An arrogant and jaded Las Vegas stage magician has to find himself again after being sacked. Inconsistent but intermittently fantastic comedy; its perfunctory redemption arc story is bolstered with some great gags and a dark undercurrent throughout. Alan Arkin, as ever, steals the movie.

The Irishman [AKA I Heard You Paint Houses] (2019, dir. Martin Scorsese)

A now-aged mob hitman reflects. A stunning revisiting of themes preoccupying Scorsese throughout his career; gang life, organised crime, Catholic guilt. Sombre and melancholy, and Ellroy-like in its alt-history approach to the American 20th century. A technical, dramatic and stylistic marvel, with fine performances all around, none less than from Pesci, who’s revelatory here. Hugely recommended.

Kevin and Perry Go Large (2000, dir. Ed Bye)

Two teenage wannabe DJs go on holiday to Ibiza to lose their virginities. 90s sketch show characters get the send-them-on-vacation spinoff plot; gross-out humour and a surprisingly charming undercurrent make for a patchy flick, but Enfield and Burke capture adolescent friendship well, with the latter’s physical performance tremendous.

Rambo: Last Blood (2019, dir. Adrian Grunberg)

Disjointed and clumsy film. Rambo takes revenge on Mexican human trafficking killers. Off tone and unfortunate follow up, wasting good characters with gory but cut to pieces nonsense. The standard Rambo body count applies. All else is dull and uninteresting.

A second opinion can be found here

Overdrive (2017, dir. Antonio Negret)

Two car-criminal brothers have to steal a rare sports car to repay a debt. Glossy, slick, and glamorous escapist entertainment made with some skill. Indebted to Gone in 60 Seconds / Fast & Furious flicks, with a dash of Europacorp-ish South of France style. Fun while it’s on, and good-looking throughout.

Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019, dir. Jon Watts)

Peter Parker, on a European school trip with his classmates, comes into contact with both elemental monsters and a new superhero, Mysterio. Upbeat if overlong blend of teen road trip comedy and standard heroic action thrills, acting as a coda to Avengers: Endgame. Well-played and likeable, if episodic on several levels.