Little Monsters (2019, dir. Abe Forsythe)

A loser musician and a kindergarten teacher defend a class visiting a petting zoo from zombies. Sprightly horror-comedy which balances humour, romance, gross-out violence and crassness in expert measure. Loads of fun, some heart, some songs, and a selection of great gags. Recommended.

Kingsman: The Secret Service (2014, dir. Matthew Vaughn)

A cockney youth is inducted into an elite British secret agency. Confident spy comedy from the graphic novel series, both spoofing and celebrating Bond and The Avengers in equal measure. Stylised and violent; not for everyone in its laddish glee. A sequel, expanding the universe, soon followed.

Backdraft 2 (2019, dir. Gonzalo López-Gallego)

A Chicago arson investigator tracks down the causes of a series of fires intending to cover a larger crime. While the reveal doesn’t quite work, this is mostly a superior DTV sequel which improves on the soapy early 90s original. And yep, Donald Sutherland pops up again, in a slightly enhanced reprise of his Lecter-ish firebomber.

Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019, dir. Michael Dougherty)

The Russells and others fight the emerging Titans; and work to support Godzilla. Decent if slightly over-serious continuation of the 2014 rebooted cycle with a canny cast of character actors and a genuine sense of the spectacular. Light on story, but heavy on Kyle Chandler reaction shots, plus monster-fu aplenty.

Miss Bala (2019, dir. Catherine Hardwicke)

A young woman caught up in a nightclub shooting has to go undercover against a cartel. While its focus on people rather than action is perhaps commendable, this US remake of the 2011 Spanish-language original isn’t dramatic enough to deliver suspense, or feisty enough to please gunplay fans, despite a committed central performance.

Anna (2019, dir. Luc Besson)

A lost young woman becomes an elite model by day, a KGB assassin by night. It’s Besson-by-numbers in this straightforward Europacorp espionage/action thriller, lifting bits from La Femme Nikita and in so doing aping the recent Red Sparrow. Decent setpieces, some lazy tech-related anachronisms, and reliable character actors slumming.

Cat People (1942, dir. Jacques Tourneur)

A Serbian woman in New York fears she cannot love because of an ancient curse. Tremendous noir/horror hybrid, taking inspiration from werewolf archetypes. Huge amounts of fun, breathtaking in its economy, and with some great suspense set-pieces. Highly recommended. A sequel – The Curse of the Cat People – followed in 1944.