Disenchanted (2022, dir. Adam Shankman)

A now-disaffected Giselle and family have to work together when a magical accident means Andalasia overlaps with upstate New York. Patchy, padded belated sequel stuffed with duff songs and no real reason to exist. Maya Rudolph has fun as a baddie this time out, and that’s about it.

Here’s the trailer.

The Woman in the Window (2021, dir. Joe Wright)

An agoraphobic and alcoholic psychiatrist believes she witnesses a murder. A strong cast and at-times confident direction can’t save this attempt to emulate a De Palma-ish emulation in turn of Hitchcock. A silly script is the main issue: good actors have little to do, though Amy Adams clearly relishes the chance to play vulnerable. Copycat did this better.

Here’s the trailer.

Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian [AKA Night at the Museum 2] (2009, dir. Shawn Levy)

Larry and friends fight a reanimated pharaoh intent on conquering the world. Second and best of the family adventure flicks, not being saddled with set-up, and having confidence to play with its premise in fun and inventive ways. Highlights include Amy Adams and Hank Azaria, both revelling in their roles.

Here’s the trailer.

Enchanted (2007, dir. Kevin Lima)

A fairytale princess is magically transported to present-day New York. Excellent musical rom-com which satirises and celebrates Disney animated fairy stories at the same time. Lots to enjoy: great songs, fine performances, a keen sense of self-awareness, and no little affection for its subjects.

Vice (2018, dir. Adam McKay)

A satirical biopic of GW Bush’s vice-president Dick Cheney. Soberer than The Big Short, this thematic sequel offers an accessible overview of Cheney’s rise to silent power and his ultimate betrayal of himself. The film doesn’t get inside its protagonist, but is revelatory nevertheless.

Trouble With The Curve (2012, dir. Robert Lorenz)

A grizzled baseball scout takes a road trip with his ambitious lawyer daughter. There’s nothing original in this sports/family/romance hybrid, but everything works fine; a professional job all around. Another Eastwood meditation on ageing, with a fine supporting cast.

Nocturnal Animals (2016, dir. Tom Ford)

A woman reads her former husband’s novel. Good-looking though bleak slow-burn thriller intercutting between a novel and its reading; the fiction within the film is more interesting than the frame narrative, though. Michael Shannon superb in support.

Want another opinion from a member of the 255Review crew? Lemonsquirtle’s┬átake on the movie is here.