Die Hard 2 [AKA Die Hard 2: Die Harder] (1990, dir. Renny Harlin)

John McClane intervenes to stop mercenaries from freeing a high-value prisoner from a snowbound airport. Messy serio-comic sequel that bends over backwards to link itself to the first film. It scrapes by on residual goodwill from its predecessor, but that’s about it.

Here’s the trailer.

Son Of A Gun (2014, dir. Julius Avery)

A young convict gets in over his head with a charismatic bank robber. Generally effective crime drama with a few black comic and slightly pretentious touches. Solid performances and a matter-of-fact approach to the action help.

Here’s the trailer.

Legacy of Lies (2020, dir. Adrian Bol)

A former MI6 agent’s past comes back to haunt him. OK DTV actioner from the reliable Scott Adkins, with decent fight choreography and some pizazz in the direction. Secrets and double-crosses as per, though there’s couple of interesting script wrinkles. No gamechanger, but fans will be happy.

Here’s the trailer.

3022 (2019, dir. John Suits)

A long-haul mission space station crew fractures when Earth is destroyed. Talky SF pic that wants to be both Solaris and Gravity but can’t settle, trying for both thriller and psychological study to variable effect. Some effective use of a decent cast and limited resources, but the scattershot scripting fluffs the ending, which is a shame.

Here’s the trailer.

The Island (1980, dir. Michael Ritchie)

A journalist investigating vessel disappearances in the Caribbean finds the modern-day descendants of 18th-century pirates are responsible. While the movie (adapted from a post-Jaws Peter Benchley book) doesn’t do its premise justice, there’s some fun to be had, not least in the gleeful supporting cast of Brit character actors.

Here’s the trailer.

John Henry (2020, dir. Will Forbes)

A middle-aged former gang member is forced to confront his past. Slow-burn, stylised LA gangland movie that riffs on John Wick, Tarantino, westerns, folk stories and a lot more. Patchy but with impressive elements, and a fine central performance plus great Ken Foree support.

Here’s the trailer.

Urban Legends: Final Cut [AKA Urban Legend 2; Urban Legends: The Final Cut] (2000, dir. John Ottman)

A serial killer stalks a group of film students. Tenuous (and only vaguely urban legend-ish) sequel that has fun moments and a couple of neat movie shout-outs, but which is unscary, not gory, is illogical, and has few characters to root for. The whodunnit angle gets lost in the process. A third movie followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Urban Legend (1998, dir. Jamie Blanks)

A serial killer stalks a campus, the killings inspired by urban legends. Generally satisfactory self-aware post-Scream whodunnit/slasher hybrid with pretensions to John Carpenter, though light on scares and grue, and clumsy in terms of representation. Fun support from stalwarts Robert Englund, Brad Dourif and Julian Ritchings helps. Two sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

The Park Is Mine (1985, dir. Steven Hilliard Stern)

A struggling ex-soldier holds Central Park hostage to gain attention for veterans’ issues. Odd mix of post-First Blood action and issues-based drama, this talky oddball siege flick has a lot going for it, even if it feels compromised in its execution.

Here’s the trailer.

Hollow Man (2000, dir. Paul Verhoeven)

An arrogant scientist unleashes his dark side when invisibility experiments go wrong. While lacking the satiric edge of Verhoeven’s best US SF-infused work, this is still a fun, well-resourced and knowingly sleazy horror flick, with all involved operating effectively, showcasing still-impressive effects work..

Here’s the trailer.