The House That Dripped Blood (1971, dir. Peter Duffell)

A detective investigates a missing film star, leading him to enquire into a house’s tragic history. Brisk Amicus anthology horror based on Robert Bloch short stories (with one standout yarn) – four twisty tales plus a wraparound story – delivering value for money and some genre-friendly faces.

Here’s the trailer.

The Outfit (2022, dir. Graham Moore)

An unassuming tailor finds himself caught in a war between rival mobsters. Deliberately stagey crime drama seemingly based on the pun in the title, with the kinds of twists one might expect: anchored by an immaculate Mark Rylance performance. Not especially filmic, but enjoyable on its own terms.

Here’s the trailer.

Sideshow (2020, dir. Adam Oldroyd)

A misanthropic stage psychic is the victim of a home invasion. Grubby little comedy-thriller with a focus on making Les Dennis as authentically unlikable as possible. Some good lines sneak through, there’s an okay end-of-the-pier vibe to it, and a genuinely WTF ending that makes this a passable one-time watch.

Here’s the trailer.

The Night House (2020, dir. David Bruckner)

A recently widowed woman starts to believe her house is haunted by her dead husband. Effective ghost story with some terrific scare moments and lingering unease. The payoff is a little tricksy, but this is well worth your focus nevertheless, not least for Rebecca Hall’s immaculate central performance.

Here’s the trailer.

Goodnight Mommy (2022, dir. Matt Sobel)

Twin boys begin to suspect that their mother is not who she claims to be. Muted and perhaps over-respectful English-language remake of the 2014 Austrian original. The performances are uniformly good, mind, even if the reveals aren’t strong: Naomi Watts delivers another variant on her mum (or not…) under pressure specialism.

Here’s the trailer.

Arctic Blast (2010, dir. Brian Trenchard-Smith)

A meteorologist struggles with family and professional pressures as a freak weather event threatens Australia. Bargain basement though watchable cover version of the likes of The Day After Tomorrow: SciFi Channel / The Asylum production values, but this is no worse ultimately than the big-budget versions.

Here’s the trailer.

The Postcard Killings (2020, dir. Danis Tanović)

A detective crosses Europe on the trail of serial killers responsible for his daughter’s death. Tickbox post-Lecter thriller (from a James Patterson novel) held together by Jeffrey Dean Morgan and – initially – some strong moments. It collapses, though, under the weight of ho-hum twists and a throwaway ending.

Here’s the trailer.

Poker Face (2022, dir. Russell Crowe)

A high-stakes poker game among old friends gets out of hand. It’s messy (takes an age to get going) and both sweaty but not quite sleazy enough. At 80 minutes plus credits, it’s only just a movie too. There’s a solid half hour in the middle though: Benedict Hardie is especially fun.

Here’s the trailer.

The Awakening (2011, dir. Nick Murphy)

1921 London: a debunker of fake mediums is asked to investigate a haunting at a boys’ school. Autumnal and good-looking psychological thriller: it takes a hard left turn late on that requires a huge leap of faith, but there’s plenty in the first hour especially to please subgenre fans. No relation to the 1980 flick of the same name.

Here’s the trailer.

See How They Run (2022, dir. Tom George)

A murder occurs during a performance of The Mousetrap: an investigation begins. Ever-so-slightly pleased with itself mashup of allsorts – The Real Inspector Hound, Noises Off, Agatha Christie, even a Brian de Palma moment or two – that’s nevertheless brisk, funny, well-played, and looks great.

Here’s the trailer.