Daughter of the Wolf (2019, dir. David Hackl)

A mother trackers her son’s kidnappers across a snowy wilderness. Okay DTV thriller with some decent production values but a perfunctory plot and awkward action direction. Richard Dreyfuss offers up some enjoyable supporting ham.

Point Blank (2019, dir. Joe Lynch)

A trainee doctor is forced to go on the run with an escaped prisoner. Straightforward chase thriller that holds itself together via its lead performances. The usual double-crosses and switches, though the movie undercuts its committed leads with some awkward comedic juxtapositions and musical cues.

The Happytime Murders (2018, dir. Brian Henson)

A puppet PI and his former partner team up to solve a series of murders. It nearly works, but the emphasis on gross-out humour instead of playing the Roger Rabbit-ish concept means that some good moments, decent playing and undoubted technical expertise all get lost.

Superfly (2018, dir. Director X)

A Georgia drug dealer tries for one last score to get out of the life. Okay remake/reprise that’s more style than substance, too often simply presenting the genre tropes than doing much useful with them. Some interesting moments, though, and a good Morris Day joke.

End of Watch (2012, dir. David Ayer)

Two LA patrol cops cross the paths of a street gang keen to make their mark. Excellent contemporary crime drama focusing on cop camaraderie. A semi-improvised approach and use of found footage give the movie texture, as does the rapport between the lead actors. Recommended.

Identity Thief (2013, dir. Seth Gordon)

A mild-mannered accountant and a con artist go on a cross-country trip to prove the former’s innocence. Patchy road movie comedy that apes Midnight Run, but which – despite game playing by its leads – invariably resorts to cheap laughs and stock situations.

White Boy Rick (2018, dir. Yann Demange)

The true story of Rick Wershe, drug dealer and teen FBI informant. Intriguing spin on the rise-and-fall story, focusing on the latter; good performances, and director Demange again shows he can handle drama, action, genre, character actors and period detail.