Galveston (2018, dir. Mélanie Laurent)

A dying criminal finds himself on the run with a young woman. Smart, low key hardscrabble crime drama from the Nic Pizzalatto novel. Can’t quite decide to go for arthouse or for jailhouse, but worth your time nevertheless.

Here’s the trailer.

Echo Boomers (2020, dir. Seth Savoy)

A young man is recruited by this Chicago-based cousin for a series of art heists. Okay though too-slick-for-its-own-good thievery thriller, enlivened by a Michael Shannon supporting role and by some confidence in its execution, despite a lack of actual story.

Here’s the trailer.

El Robo del Siglo [AKA The Heist of the Century] (2020, dir. Ariel Winograd)

An Argentinian artist and his associates plan to rob a bank. Fast, funny and stylish comedy-suspense thriller, based on a true story. Lots of fun and no little swagger to it: recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Murder on the Orient Express (1974, dir. Sidney Lumet)

Hercule Poirot must investigate a killing on a luxury sleeper service. Handsome if slightly stagey and camp version of the Agatha Christie stalwart. An awkward backstory and too many starry suspects make for tricky telescoping of the novel, but fans won’t mind a bit.

Here’s the trailer. And a previous review.

Army Of One (2020, dir. Stephen Dunham)

An ex-special forces soldier takes on the matriarchal backwoods criminal clan who killed her husband. Effective DTV vehicle that maximises limited resources, showcasing Ellen Hollman well. Plenty of unpretentious fisticuffs fun: sharper script and direction, and this would have been a minor classic.

Here’s the trailer.

Son Of A Gun (2014, dir. Julius Avery)

A young convict gets in over his head with a charismatic bank robber. Generally effective crime drama with a few black comic and slightly pretentious touches. Solid performances and a matter-of-fact approach to the action help.

Here’s the trailer.

An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn (2018, dir. Jim Hosking)

Disparate eccentrics converge on a hotel where a special event is to take place. Deadpan crime comedy that might very well have been lots of fun to make. Some good moments from a solid cast, but this is an awkward beast that doesn’t really work.

Here’s the trailer.

Bad Education (2020, dir. Cory Finlay)

A school superintendent and their deputy are revealed, in part by a student investigation, to be embezzling from the school system. Smart black comedy-drama, based on a true story. Underplayed throughout, with fine performances from seasoned hands, and a sense that maybe the right lessons are still to be learned by some.

Hammer (2019, dir. Christian Sparkes)

An estranged father and son are forced to work together when a drug deal goes wrong. Smart, lean all-in-one-day indie thriller with as keen a focus on character and relationships as on the narrative’s spiralling complications. Lots to appreciate and enjoy; recommended. Great to see Will Patton in a leading role too.

True History of the Kelly Gang (2019, dir. Justin Kurzel)

The life of an Australian outlaw, as narrated to his child. An excellent adaptation of the Peter Carey novel, with vivid performances and a distinctive visual approach. The best movie version of the Ned Kelly story to date, and a strong arty outback Western in its own right. Recommended.