Zero Dark Thirty (2012, dir. Kathryn Bigelow)

A dramatisation of the hunt for and killing of Osama Bin Laden. Sober and focused, with an eye for detail and on the selling of its version of events as truth through the use of faux documentary techniques, this works as an intelligent thriller throughout.

Close (2019, dir. Vicky Jewson)

A bodyguard is assigned to protect the wayward daughter of an embattled corporate executive. Smart, tight little thriller with a focus on relationships as well as on low-key but still effective action, marking out the director as one to watch.

It’s A Wonderful Life (1946, dir. Frank Capra)

A suicidal man is shown there’s hope by an angel-in-training. Peerless Christmas fantasy riffing on A Christmas Carol. Just about note-perfect throughout.

We Bought A Zoo (2011, dir. Cameron Crowe)

A widowed father buys a run-down zoo, and battles to have it open in time for the summer. Sunny-enough feelgood comedy/drama/romance with absolutely no surprises but some neat moments and an impeccable – if over-used – soundtrack.

Angelica (2015, dir. Mitchell Lichtenstein)

In late-Victorian London, a young mother is troubled by what might be a poltergeist. Handsome but odd cod-Freudian drama which flirts with fantasy, Jekyll & Hyde-isms, and unlocked sexuality in all kinds of ways.

Jules et Jim (1962, dir. Francois Truffaut)

Two decades (pre- and post-WWI)in the lives of two men and the woman they both love. Peerless example of the French New Wave; its impact dulled by time perhaps inevitably, but nevertheless a fascinating movie crammed with daring thematic and technical ideas.

The Debt Collector (2018, dir. Jesse V. Johnson)

A desperate-for-money martial arts instructor takes a job as a  debt collector. Okay thick ear, with a fight every 5 minutes and some comic moments. Old-school in many ways, and with a tacked-on plot that doesn’t quite work, but reasonable fun for fisticuffs fans.