The Mummy (1959, dir. Terence Fisher)

A group of English archaeologists are targeted for revenge killings by an Egyptian priest. Dated, stage-bound, though still enjoyable minor Hammer horror movie, assembling its script from across the Universal flicks. Interestingly, the villain’s motives now appear perfectly reasonable, even if his methods are extreme.

The Abominable Snowman (1957, dir. Val Guest)

A scientific expedition to the Himalayas becomes a hunt for the fabled Yeti. Marvellous fantasy-horror hybrid, expanded (and simplified somewhat) from Nigel Kneale’s BBC drama The Creature. Lots of ideas played with, great production values, and lovely widescreen – Regalscope AKA Hammerscope – cinematography and staging.

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957, dir. Terence Fisher)

A condemned nobleman scientist confesses his experiments in human reanimation. Sensational in its time, this first Hammer gothic literature adaptation not only offers a template for two decades of productions, but still works in dramatic and genre terms, with direction, lead performance, and art direction all standouts.

Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell (1974, dir. Terence Fisher)

Frankenstein, hiding out in a lunatic asylum, takes on a young disciple. The last of the Hammer series is an okay entry, hampered by over-familiarity and a poorly-designed creature, but with some nifty moments and Cushing’s typically meticulous performance.

Star Wars [AKA Star Wars Episode 4: A New Hope] (1977, dir. George Lucas)

An orphaned farmhand finds he is the chosen one to lead an intergalactic rebellion. Splendid and modest SF/fairy story hybrid, unfairly weighed down by later expectations. In its own terms, a sprightly and successful adventure, nothing more.

The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973, dir. Alan Gibson)

In modern-day London, Dracula is behind an establishment conspiracy to unleash a plague epidemic. Modish late series entry, with loads of ideas, and an approach drawing on SF and a Bond villain plot. Fun, within its limitations, and impeccably played.

Dr Terror’s House of Horrors (1965, dir. Freddie Francis)

Five men on a train have their fortunes told by the mysterious Dr Schreck. The first Amicus horror anthology is tremendous, mixing classic tropes with modish 60s pop culture, delivering a suite of chills and thrills backed up by expert playing from an unparalleled ensemble cast.