Bean [AKA Bean: The Ultimate Disaster Movie] (1997, dir. Mel Smith)

A lowly museum attendant is mistakenly sent to Los Angeles as an art expert. Awkward expansion of the TV series, relying on embarrassment and slapstick in equal measure. Inevitably, some moments work (the supporting cast is great), but too much of this is simply unfunny sentimental gurning.

Peppermint (2018, dir. Pierre Morel)

Five years after her family’s murder, a mother returns to the US for revenge. Straightforward action fantasy with a committed lead performance and an outsider’s view of LA. Not great, but there’s a couple of interesting plot wrinkles along the way.

Lowlife (2017, dir. Ryan Prows)

A masked failure tries to live up to the fabled reputation of his father. LA-set black comedy crime drama, involving human organ theft, kidnapping, Luchadors and gun-toting motel owners. Not for everyone, but a confident and at times affecting violent entertainment.

Constantine (2005, dir. Francis Lawrence)

A damned occultist battles a demonic attempt to take over the Earth. Fun apocalyptic fantasy-horror-action hybrid, loosely based on the Hellblazer comic. Lots to enjoy, though over-reliance on CG softens the film’s impact.

The Debt Collector (2018, dir. Jesse V. Johnson)

A desperate-for-money martial arts instructor takes a job as a  debt collector. Okay thick ear, with a fight every 5 minutes and some comic moments. Old-school in many ways, and with a tacked-on plot that doesn’t quite work, but reasonable fun for fisticuffs fans.

Molly’s Game (2017, dir. Aaron Sorkin)

The true story of Molly Bloom, who ran high-stakes poker games in New York and LA. Excellent drama, balanced by a fine central performance and swaggering writing, chronicling a perhaps typical rise and fall-style story, but done with class and confidence.

Alternative view here

Roman J Israel, Esq (2017, dir. Dan Gilroy)

A socially-awkward lawyer faces troubles when he has to engage with the wider legal world. Though it doesn’t quite work as drama, there’s a lot to appreciate here, not least fine playing from its leads, and a bag of perhaps-unfashionable ideas about social justice.