Wall-E (2008, dir. Andrew Stanton)

A beat-up robot falls in love with a sleek new model. Superior SF comedy/romance from Pixar; the last hour is knockabout fun with an environmental/healthy living message, but the first 30 minutes is a sublime silent (apart from music from Hello, Dolly! of all things) movie of its own.

Let Her Out (2016, dir. Cody Calahan)

A young woman finds she is possessed by her unborn twin, growing as a tumour in her brain. Grubby little horror pic with decent gore effects, but with a glum premise, iffy interior logic, a queasy and wholly unjustified focus on rape, and an unravelling storyline.

King Cohen (2017, dir. Steve Mitchell)

Documentary offering a career retrospective of writer/director Larry Cohen. And an utterly splendid thing it is too; Cohen is engaging and forthright, and a blend of clips, archive footage, and interviews underlines Cohen’s significance to genre. Well worth your time.

Sequence Break (2017, dir. Graham Skipper)

A shy video game repair shop worker finds a strange circuit board containing a mesmerising new game. A homage to Cronenberg/Tsukamoto-ish body horror which doesn’t quite know what do do with its premise, and so goes the freakout route.

Freehold (2017, dir. Dominic Bridges)

An estate agent’s flat has a secret lodger, who shifts from a subsistence existence to a campaign of psychological warfare. The first hour is great, but the lack of an ending and a clunky coda undermine some of the movie’s earlier successes. Worth watching tho.

Kill Me Three Times (2014, dir. Kriv Stenders)

Three sets of interrelated complications involving a jaded hit man. Great-looking and confidently-directed but thoroughly unfunny would-be comedy-thriller that tries something Tarantino/McDonagh-ish but ends up like 90s wannabes such as Three Days In The Valley.

A Walk Among The Tombstones (2014, dir. Scott Frank)

An ex-cop turned unlicensed private eye investigates a kidnapping. Generally effective adaptation of one of Lawrence Block’s Matt Scudder novels, which perhaps over-reaches by telescoping several books’ backstory into a single narrative. Bleak and autumnal; not one of Neeson’s lighter actioners.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s review.