King Cohen (2017, dir. Steve Mitchell)

Documentary offering a career retrospective of writer/director Larry Cohen. And an utterly splendid thing it is too; Cohen is engaging and forthright, and a blend of clips, archive footage, and interviews underlines Cohen’s significance to genre. Well worth your time.

Sequence Break (2017, dir. Graham Skipper)

A shy video game repair shop worker finds a strange circuit board containing a mesmerising new game. A homage to Cronenberg/Tsukamoto-ish body horror which doesn’t quite know what do do with its premise, and so goes the freakout route.

Freehold (2017, dir. Dominic Bridges)

An estate agent’s flat has a secret lodger, who shifts from a subsistence existence to a campaign of psychological warfare. The first hour is great, but the lack of an ending and a clunky coda undermine some of the movie’s earlier successes. Worth watching tho.

Kill Me Three Times (2014, dir. Kriv Stenders)

Three sets of interrelated complications involving a jaded hit man. Great-looking and confidently-directed but thoroughly unfunny would-be comedy-thriller that tries something Tarantino/McDonagh-ish but ends up like 90s wannabes such as Three Days In The Valley.

A Walk Among The Tombstones (2014, dir. Scott Frank)

An ex-cop turned unlicensed private eye investigates a kidnapping. Generally effective adaptation of one of Lawrence Block’s Matt Scudder novels, which perhaps over-reaches by telescoping several books’ backstory into a single narrative. Bleak and autumnal; not one of Neeson’s lighter actioners.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s review.

Scorpio (1973, dir. Michael Winner)

A veteran CIA agent wants out; he goes on the run, his protege is contracted to kill him. Glum international thriller that wants to be Le Carre. Some good moments and much quality in the cast, but this is standard downbeat spy stuff.

Dunkirk (2017, dir. Christopher Nolan)

Three linked stories, told in different timescales, related to the Allied retreat from Dunkirk. Equal parts puzzle, technical marvel, victory-from-defeat drama, disaster movie and arthouse flick, Nolan’s film is a thing of bleak and understated beauty. Highly recommended.

Want another 255 view? Here’s Xussia’s perspective.