Leprechaun Returns (2018, dir. Steven Kostanski)

The building of a remote sorority house disturbs an ancient evil. OK sequel that ties directly back to the first in the long-running series. Plenty of kills, some splattery gore, and a couple of reasonable gags, even if there’s little here for series newbies.

Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese (2019, dir. Martin Scorsese)

A quasi-documentary (archive footage, plus new interviews and other – fabricated –  material) about Bob Dylan’s 75-76 US tour. Splendid and slippery attempt to capture/deconstruct a party on wheels masterminded by a playful set of hosts: Dylan, then Scorsese.

Game of Thrones: The Last Watch (2019, dir. Jeanie Findlay)

A behind-the-scenes documentary on the making of the final series of HBO ratings juggernaut Game of Thrones. Excellent making-of doc, focusing both on the logistical challenges of big-budget TV, and of the relationships between the production and Belfast.

Halloween (2018, dir. David Gordon Green)

40 years later, Michael Myers escapes to track down Laurie Strode again. Decent-enough and respectful series reboot (ignoring all the sequels), albeit one which feels too restrained. Some awkward storytelling doesn’t help either, one lovely moment and one great child actor aside.

House (1986, dir. Steve Miner)

A blocked writer seeks refuge in his deceased aunt’s haunted house. Awkward comedy-horror with neither enough scares or laughs. Some weird moments linger, but the overly-busy screenplay (Vietnam trauma, childhood bereavement, etc) and flat TV-style lighting and direction don’t help.

Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay (2012, dir. Molly Bernstein & Alan Edelstein)

Documentary on the late American magician, his inspirations in magic and his place in contemporary close-up magic. A fine career overview and just enough of a glimpse into the man to reveal his complexities as a person. Highly recommended.

Winchester (2018, dir. The Spierig Brothers)

A widowed doctor is hired to prove that the eccentric owner of a weapons company is insane. Handsomely-mounted jumpscare horror that doesn’t find much to do with its based-on-a-true-story premise, so settles for a few boos and no eews. Disappointing, given the talent involved.