Aladdin (2019, dir. Guy Ritchie)

A street thief falls for a princess; a magic lamp offers the opportunity to win her hand. Okay-as-far-as-it-goes live-action/CG remake of the 1992 Disney animation. A couple of new songs, Will Smith brings some pizazz as the genie, and a nice magic carpet gag; otherwise this is a product rather than a movie, and feels it at times too.

Mary Poppins Returns (2018, dir. Rob Marshall)

A generation after the events of Mary Poppins, the magical nanny returns to the Banks family, this time to help them save their home. Despite care and affection for the original, this is a reprise rather than a sequel. Emily Blunt lacks the lightness of touch of Julie Andrews, and the songs tend to the unmemorable.

Mary Poppins (1964, dir. Robert Stevenson)

In Edwardian London, a magical nanny aids a family in need. Solid musical comedy with then state-of-the-art animation/live-action hybrid sequences and practical effects. Some great songs, a sense of playfulness, and an iconic central performance. A sequel was made in 2018.

Enchanted (2007, dir. Kevin Lima)

A fairytale princess is magically transported to present-day New York. Excellent musical rom-com which satirises and celebrates Disney animated fairy stories at the same time. Lots to enjoy: great songs, fine performances, a keen sense of self-awareness, and no little affection for its subjects.

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (2018, dir. Ol Parker)

In 1979, a student has romantic adventures in the Med; this links with the present. Both sequel and prequel to Mamma Mia!, this ABBA-based jukebox musical is part-reprise, part deconstruction. More fun than the first, and as impermeable to criticism as its predecessor. You’ll either love it, or be baffled.

Carmen Jones (1954, dir. Otto Preminger)

A free-spirited woman compels a once-clean-cut GI to go AWOL. A World War II-era retelling of Bizet’s Carmen with an all-black cast, retaining the music but with updated lyrics. A film version of a famous stage adaptation; this sacrifices drama for a lighter touch until the third act, but is nevertheless an engaging oddity.

Stop Making Sense (1984, dir. Jonathan Demme)

Filmed record of Talking Heads live, from the 1983 Speaking in Tongues tour. Shot over four nights, this is perhaps the greatest single concert movie; a project designed by people with cinematic, musical, theatrical and gig awareness. Recommended, even if you don’t care for the Heads‘ nerd-art-funk.