Tales From The Crypt (1972, dir. Freddie Francis)

Five strangers are presented with glimpses of their transgressions. Strong Amicus portmanteau horror film in the EC Comics tradition, with an early 70s cast of British character actors to die for. Straightforward morality tales with nasty ideas lurking, plus a loose The Monkey’s Paw adaptation for good measure.

Here’s the trailer.

Accidental Courtesy: Daryl Davis, Race & America (2016, dir. Matthew Ornstein)

A documentary portrait of US musician Daryl Davis, who has made it a personal mission to befriend and understand Klan members. An interesting biography on a personalised mission to undo the Klan. Both the strengths and flaws of Davis’s approach are explored in an even-handed manner; a fascinating case study.

Here’s the trailer.

Enola Holmes (2020, dir. Harry Bradbeer)

Sherlock Holmes’ younger sister Enola investigates their mother’s disappearance. Handsomely-produced but wildly inconsistent Victorian teen detective romp. A strong cast and good production values help, but a weak and smug script scuppers the enterprise as a whole, despite fun moments.

Here’s the trailer.

Higher Power (2018, dir. Matthew Charles Santoro)

A self-destructive father is targeted because of his unique DNA. Awkward and clumsy low-budget oddball superhero/metaphysical drama. Functions rather better than a CG effects showcase than as a movie, despite reliable villainy from Colm Feore.

Here’s the trailer:

Blood From The Mummy’s Tomb (1971, dir. Seth Holt [and Michael Carreras])

The daughter of an Egyptologist is being groomed as a reincarnation of a deity. Claustrophobic adaptation of Stoker’s The Jewel of the Seven Stars. Alternately tatty, mod, and mesmerising, the film has effective elements and a fun cast, while working with clearly restricted resources.

Here’s the trailer.

Star Trek: Generations (1994, dir. David Carson)

A temporal anomaly brings Picard and Kirk together in uniting against a common temporal foe. Awkward series entry passing the movie baton to the Next Generation crew. Televisual story and handling, though, with a low-key exit for Kirk. For completists only.

Here’s the trailer.

Mr Bean’s Holiday (2007, dir. Steve Bendelack)

Mr Bean wins a holiday to the French Riviera, but has trouble getting there. Superior road movie sequel that starts slowly but gains momentum. Slapstick, sight gags, some deft movie industry satire, plus a genuinely heart-warming climax.

Here’s the trailer:

The Devil All The Time (2020, dir. Antonio Campos)

An Ohio family is linked in different ways with a series of tragedies and crimes. Splendid adaptation of the Donald Ray Pollock novel; a brooding back country gothic noir meditating on faith and violence. Not for everyone, but there’s strong work from all concerned here. Recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Jaws (1975, dir. Steven Spielberg)

A coastal resort is threatened by a predatory great white shark. Peerless proto-blockbuster and inventor of the summer event movie, Jaws retains its ability to thrill and impress. Character, action, location shooting, direction and a semi-improvised approach to dialogue are counterpointed by a terrific score. Sequels of diminishing quality followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem [AKA AVPR: Aliens vs Predator 2 – Requiem] (2007, dir. The Brothers Strause)

A Predator attempts to clear an alien infestation of a Colorado town. Banal direct sequel to Alien vs. Predator, oddly combining high-school slasher tropes with full-on monster mayhem. Dumb, visually murky and nigh plotless, though a couple of transgressive ideas lurk. A franchise low.

Here’s the trailer.