You Were Never Really Here (2017, dir. Lynne Ramsey)

A hitman struggling with mental health issues accepts a contract to rescue a trafficked child. Deliberate, beautiful, and cryptic, this noir drama isn’t for everyone in its mix of arthouse and genre, but is nevertheless well worth your time. Recommended.

The Post (2017, dir. Steven Spielberg)

The Washington Post battles to source and then publish revelations about the Vietnam War. Effective journalistic thriller, which works as a prequel to All The President’s Men and as a contemporary allegory. Good performances all round, especially from Streep.

Maze Runner: The Death Cure (2018, dir. Wes Ball)

Thomas and friends mount a rescue mission. Third and last of the OK YA dystopian franchise. It doesn’t make much plot sense, but the action is capably handled, production design is good, and there’s a refreshing physicality to proceedings. For series fans only tho.

Escape From LA [AKA John Carpenter’s Escape From LA] (1996, dir. John Carpenter)

Snake Plissken is compelled to rescue a gadget from what is now the island prison of Los Angeles. Campy though large-scale reprise of the 1981 predecessor. Some moments work, but this is lesser Carpenter, and a film blighted by woeful CG.

Sicario (2015, dir. Denis Villeneuve)

A female FBI agent gets in over her head when she volunteers to liaise with an inter-agency anti-drugs team. Smart, bleak and suspenseful thriller with great performances and some standout sequences. Recommended.

The Death of Stalin (2017, dir. Armando Iannucci)

A power struggle ensues in the USSR when Stalin dies suddenly. Frantic black comedy which plays totalitarianism as a dark farce. Hugely impressive, with a great cast clearly having fun throughout, while making a few satirical points along the way. Recommended.

Men In Black (1997, dir. Barry Sonnenfeld)

An NYPD cop is recruited into a secret anti-alien taskforce. Brisk SF comedy-thriller with some good moments and neat odd-couple playing from its leads, but too concerned with sub-Ghost Busters slapstick than with exploring the potential of its premise.