Kingsman: The Golden Circle (2017, dir. Matthew Vaughn)

Kingsmen join with their American equivalent to battle a virus-wielding drug lord. Gleeful but over-stuffed, overlong and indulgent sequel, magnifying the first film’s good points and its issues. Some fun to be had, tho, and Mark Strong gets a crowning moment of awesome.

The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973, dir. Alan Gibson)

In modern-day London, Dracula is behind an establishment conspiracy to unleash a plague epidemic. Modish late series entry, with loads of ideas, and an approach drawing on SF and a Bond villain plot. Fun, within its limitations, and impeccably played.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017, dir. Martin McDonagh)

A woman pursues justice for her murdered daughter. Offbeat black comedy-drama with little concession to likeability or straightforwardness. Hugely enjoyable, though, with great performances, and keeps always on the right side of quirky.

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Roman J Israel, Esq (2017, dir. Dan Gilroy)

A socially-awkward lawyer faces troubles when he has to engage with the wider legal world. Though it doesn’t quite work as drama, there’s a lot to appreciate here, not least fine playing from its leads, and a bag of perhaps-unfashionable ideas about social justice.

The Ghost of Charnel House [AKA Charnel House] (2016, dir. Craig Moss)

A renovated former slaughterhouse may be haunted by the child of a former serial-killer employee. Overly-complicated horror shenanigans with a couple of effective moments, though undone by its backstory,  poor CG, and some obvious writing.

The Commuter (2018, dir. Jaume Collet-Serra)

A just-sacked salesman is coerced into finding a witness on his train home. Contrived but fun single-location thriller from Neeson/Collet-Serra (their 4th collaboration). Well-stocked with sneaky character actors, and there’s a third-act moment of wonder. Enjoyable tosh.

Another perspective required? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s POV.

Anon (2018, dir. Andrew Niccol)

In the near future, a detective investigates a woman without a data presence. Minimalist thriller typical of its director’s concerns with surveillance. Well-designed, and with plenty of good stuff along the way, but maybe a touch too austere, falling between arthouse and genre piece.