You’ve Got Mail (1998, dir. Nora Ephron)

An independent bookshop owner and a corporate bookstore exec fall in love pseudonymously by email. Slick update of (among others) Lubitsch’s The Shop Around The Corner, though now a 90s period piece itself in respect of its tech, its fascination with bricks-and-mortar retail, and some of its assumptions.

The Shape of Water (2017, dir. Guillermo del Toro)

A mute cleaner falls in love with a humanoid aquatic creature being held in a government research laboratory. Dazzlingly confident romantic fantasy with SF/horror touches. Amelie meets The Creature From The Black Lagoon with a bit of Little Voice. Highly recommended.

Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay (2012, dir. Molly Bernstein & Alan Edelstein)

Documentary on the late American magician, his inspirations in magic and his place in contemporary close-up magic. A fine career overview and just enough of a glimpse into the man to reveal his complexities as a person. Highly recommended.

Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning (1985, dir. Danny Steinmann)

Still traumatised by the events of Part IV, the now-adult Danny wonders if he is responsible for a new series of killings. Undistinguished mid-series entry; Part V tries some fresh ideas, but mostly settles for a high body count and gratuitous female nudity.

Winchester (2018, dir. The Spierig Brothers)

A widowed doctor is hired to prove that the eccentric owner of a weapons company is insane. Handsomely-mounted jumpscare horror that doesn’t find much to do with its based-on-a-true-story premise, so settles for a few boos and no eews. Disappointing, given the talent involved.

Lowlife (2017, dir. Ryan Prows)

A masked failure tries to live up to the fabled reputation of his father. LA-set black comedy crime drama, involving human organ theft, kidnapping, Luchadors and gun-toting motel owners. Not for everyone, but a confident and at times affecting violent entertainment.