Gemini Man (2019, dir. Ang Lee)

An elite assassin on the verge of retirement is targeted for execution. A good-looking action flick that takes ages to tell us what the poster does. One great action sequence aside, it’s underpowered, though a game support cast of Brit character actors do their best with none-more-90s material.

Ice Station Zebra (1968, dir. John Sturges)

A US submarine is tasked with a rescue mission to the Arctic, in part as cover for a covert operation. Oddly talky Cold War drama, through with solid technical credits and some fun performances, not least from McGoohan. The relative lack of action is compensated for in part by some great model work and an anti-militaristic angle.

Apollo 11 [AKA Apollo 11: First Steps Edition] (2019, dir. Todd Douglas Miller)

A documentary record of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, taken exclusively from archive footage. An oft-told true-life story, but in a new version that draws on unfamiliar and in some cases new material, much of it shot in 70mm. A tremendous addition to the canon. Recommended.

Fractured (2019, dir. Brad Anderson)

A woman and daughter go missing in an ER. Crisp, clean paranoid conspiracy thriller engaging with the director’s recurring themes of guilt and paranoia. The kind of professional, lean, efficient movie they don’t make too many of any more. Recommended.

Joker (2019, dir. Todd Phillips)

A clown with mental health issues tries to be loved and recognised. Well-shot but superficial origin story, heavily reliant on its stylistic and plot inspirations (early Scorsese movies, Bernhard Goetz). Sometimes impressive, sometimes misguided, but anchored by a committed central performance nevertheless.

South Seas Adventure [AKA Cinerama’s South Seas Adventure] (1958, dir. Carl Dudley, Richard Goldstone, Francis D Lyon, Walter Thompson, and Basil Wrangell)

A travelogue of the Pacific Rim, with fictionalised elements, incorporating Hawaii, Tahiti, New Zealand, and Australia. A glossy production, typical of its era, presenting a glamorized and stereotypical view for American viewers, while showcasing the Cinerama format. Dated and/or charming, depending on your level of indulgence.

Monos (2019, dir. Alejandro Landes)

A group of Central American teenagers guard a kidnapped doctor. Part every jungle action flick ever, part Absurdist fable. Lord of the Flies meets The Emerald Forest with a seasoning of Predator, and more than a hint of Beckett. Hugely recommended, but not for everyone.