Tucker & Dale vs. Evil (2010, dir. Eli Craig)

Two well-meaning backwoodsmen have their good intentions misunderstood by camping students. Jolly-enough horror-comedy that gets by on the charm of its leads, by a strong-enough premise, and some effective slapstick gore.

The Way, Way Back (2013, dir. Nat Faxon & Jim Rash)

A gawky 14-year-old gets a summer job at a water park to escape his dysfunctional family. A charming offbeat comedy-drama very much of two parts: a crumbling new family unit, and the escapism of the park. Highly recommended.

Storks (2016, dir. Nicholas Stoller, Doug Sweetland)

A corporate stork and a young woman have to deliver a baby. Though intermittently hilarious (the wolves are good, and there are some beautifully random jokes) this is an odd beast with a complicated set-up that has little inner logic. The usual heartwarming lessons learned, though.

Want another 255Review opinion? Here’s lemonsquirtle’s take on Storks.

Always (1989, dir. Steven Spielberg)

A dead pilot returns to allow his former partner to move on with her life. A patchy and sentimental piece (remaking 1943’sĀ A Guy Named Joe), happier in its flying, comic and firefighting action sequences than with the emotional scenes; some pleasures to be had, tho.

Moana (2016, dir. Ron Clements, John Musker, Don Hall, Chris Williams)

A Polynesian clan-leader’s daughter escapes her island home to prevent a terrible prophecy. Supremely confident quest narrative; a focused and involving animation with huge attention to story, action, and character detail. Recommended.

GoodFellas (1990, dir. Martin Scorsese)

The rise and fall of mob informant Henry Hill. Peerless, confident, cine-literate story of a generation of Mafia-related life, which stands also as a lesson in popular music, Italian cookery, and the storytelling possibilities of cinema. Magical from first frame to last.

Octopussy (1983, dir. John Glen)

Bond battles a rogue Soviet generalĀ intent on starting a nuclear war. Lacking the restraint of predecessor For Your Eyes Only, this is lesser Bond, with an eye as much on laughs as on thrills or plausibility. Louis Jourdan, though, makes for an elegant adversary.