The Monster Squad (1987, dir. Fred Dekker)

A group of monster-obsessed pre-teens have to face off against a gallery of Universal Studios villains. Straightforward and very contrived sub-Spielbergian kid adventure post-ET/The Goonies. Some of it works well, and the creature effects evidence love, but too much is perfunctory tick-box stuff that’s being rushed through.

Here’s the trailer.

The Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud [AKA Max Cloud] (2020, dir. Martin Owen)

1990: a Brooklyn teenager is transported inside the 2D platform scrolling game she’s playing. Fun little space-based riff on the Jumanji movies, made with care and with an eye to maximising limited resources. A decent script and performances help, not least DTV action star Adkins enjoying spoofing himself.

Here’s the trailer.

Bill & Ted Face The Music (2020, dir. Dean Parisot)

The now middle-aged Wyld Stallyns have to travel the multiverse to save reality, their daughters, and their marriages. Unnecessary but still welcome threequel, with enough of a spin on the same plot as twice before to pass muster. Everyone’s having fun, and Winter is especially good.

Here’s the trailer.

Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey (1991, dir. Pete Hewitt)

Bill and Ted are threatened from the future: they journey to heaven and hell to save themselves, their princesses, and humanity. Solid sequel with just enough differentiation from before to keep matters fresh. William Sandler is great as a not so-grim Reaper. A belated third movie followed.

Here’s the trailer.

El Robo del Siglo [AKA The Heist of the Century] (2020, dir. Ariel Winograd)

An Argentinian artist and his associates plan to rob a bank. Fast, funny and stylish comedy-suspense thriller, based on a true story. Lots of fun and no little swagger to it: recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989, dir. Stephen Herek)

A slacker high-school garage band duo are lent a time machine so the future can be saved by their rock music. Affable time travel comedy with likeable leads, some wit and finesse in the writing, and lightness and clarity of purpose throughout. Two sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Evil Under The Sun (1982, dir. Guy Hamilton)

Investigating a stolen jewel, Poirot finds himself at a luxury resort where there is murder afoot. An if-it-ain’t-broke sequel to Death On The Nile, though this time with the camp dialled right up. Solid cast, a fancy isolated location, a puzzle to solve, no-one taking things too seriously.

Here’s the trailer.

Airplane! [AKA Flying High] (1980, dir. Jim Abrahams, Jerry Zucker & David Zucker)

An ex-pilot with PTSD has to take control of a passenger jet when its crew are struck by food poisoning. Still-dazzling deadpan parody of 1970s disaster movies (and Zero Hour before them). Some gags and attitudes have dated, but the film’s commitment to strong jokes per minute astonishes. A weak sequel followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Christmas Eve (2015, dir. Mitch Davis)

After an accident, six New York elevators halt: their occupants are forced to know each other – and themselves – better. Contrived and clumsy festive ensemble movie: an unsubtle Christian message delivered via what’s meant to be Richard Curtis-style whimsy. Some moments work nevertheless.

Here’s the trailer.

Dad’s Army (1971, dir. Norman Cohen)

The formation and later misadventures of a Kent coastal village’s Home Guard platoon during WWII. Opened-out version of the BBC sitcom (filmed between series 3 and 4): while not as subtle as the TV version, nevertheless an affectionate portrait of class in wartime with a peerless cast of character actors.

[no trailer online that I can find!]