Captain Marvel (2019, dir. Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck)

An alien warrior works to prevent a rival species from gaining a foothold on 1995 Earth. Slow-starting but generally entertaining superhero origin flick, wisely not overdoing its nostalgic comedy; the film’s hampered somewhat by the low-stakes storyline.

Peelers (2016, dir. Sevé Schelenz)

A strip-club owner has to defend her business and her co-workers against zombies. Awkward horror-comedy that delivers in terms of gore, but manages to mishandle what should be a gleefully tasteless B–movie; the result is too-often tacky and nastily exploitative.

Point Blank (2019, dir. Joe Lynch)

A trainee doctor is forced to go on the run with an escaped prisoner. Straightforward chase thriller that holds itself together via its lead performances. The usual double-crosses and switches, though the movie undercuts its committed leads with some awkward comedic juxtapositions and musical cues.

Deep Rising (1998, dir. Stephen Sommers)

A salvage boat crew, thieves, and sundry passengers try to escape a liner under attack from sea creatures. Splendid pulpy B-movie with its tongue in its cheek, played with verve by an impeccable cast of character actors.

Rim Of The World (2019, dir. McG)

Four young teens at summer camp have to thwart an alien invasion. Deliberately throwback 80s kids’ SF adventure which is pleasing in the moment, though it struggles with an overly-knowing tone and with schematic and formulaic plotting and character development, while ticking off a slew of movie references.

Cold Pursuit (2019, dir. Hans Petter Moland)

A snowplough driver seeks revenge on the drug dealers who killed his son. Black comedy English-language remake of the director’s 2014 In Order of Disappearance/Kraftidioten. Lacks the transgressive edge of the original; a good cast doesn’t have much to do.

George A Romero’s Land of the Dead [AKA Land of the Dead] (2005, dir. George A Romero)

A gated community is threatened by an organising army of zombies. The slickest and most mainstream of Romero’s six zombie flicks, Land has some storytelling issues but also verve in its inventiveness and its writer-director’s trademark social commentary.