Ghostbusters: Afterlife (2021, dir. Jason Reitman)

A struggling family inherits a remote farmhouse formerly belonging to a Ghostbuster. A film of bits, some of them entertaining and fresh. Essentially a straight sequel to the 1984 film, it starts well as an 80s-style Amblin kid-centric comedy-drama, then reprises the original, then trips over fanservice.

Here’s the trailer. another perspective.

Ghostbusters Afterlife (2021, Dir. Jason Reitman)

The estranged family of Egon Spengler return to his home town and uncover a ghostly plan to destroy the world. While fun, this is too reliant on spoon feeding nostalgia and ticking fan check boxes. A good cast keeps you interested, but the film struggles with pacing and coherence at times.

Ghostbusters Afterlife (2021, Dir. Jason Reitman)

Ron’s Gone Wrong (2021, dir. Sarah Smith & Jean-Philippe Vine, with Octavio E. Rodriguez)

A socially-awkward boy gets a robot companion, except it’s malfunctioning. Generally straightforward (there’s some interesting darker edges and jokes) CG animation E.T. variant, that’s well-made if not really distinctive enough to set it apart from the likes of Big Hero 6 or The Mitchells Vs The Machines.

Here’s the trailer.

Encanto (2021, dir. Jared Bush & Byron Howard, with Charise Castro Smith)

A Columbian family fractures when their magical powers weaken. Great-looking but derivative animation with too much tickbox Disney stuff, saddled with dull songs. Moments amuse, and the small scale gives focus, but there’s nothing here that Moana or Coco didn’t do ten times better.

Here’s the trailer.

The Suicide Squad (2021, dir. James Gunn)

Convicted DC supervillains are recruited to undertake a covert mission. Splashy flip splattery slapstick action comedy sequel, developing into a Ghostbusters variant. Some poetic moments help, though the crowded cast needs more time to breathe than can be given here.

Here’s the trailer.

Don’t Look Up (2021, dir. Adam McKay)

Astronomers struggle to get the government and the media to engage with an extinction-level event. Patchy and overlong Trump-era satire: when it hits, it hits hard, but there’s about 45 minutes too much baggy stuff here. More focus needed: that said, there are some game performances and a great song.

Here’s the trailer.

Carry On Matron (1972, dir. Gerald Thomas)

Thieves try to steal contraceptive pills from a maternity hospital. Fourth and last of the medical-themed Carry On flicks, this is a very straightforward farce with every pregnancy gag in the book ticked off, and with crossdressing opportunities cheerfully embraced.

Here’s the trailer.

Carry On Behind (1975, dir. Gerald Thomas)

Archaeologists stay on a caravan site while completing their dig. Late series entry and part of the holiday cycle of 70s Carry Ons, riffing on 1969’s Carry On Camping. Familiar ingredients and jokes are reused: by now the formula is worn thin, though a couple of strong gags sneak by the slapstick and leering.

Here’s the trailer.

Carry On Loving (1970, dir. Gerald Thomas)

An unmarried couple runs a computer dating agency: complications ensue. Sketch-based sex farce, somewhat coarser than the series to date, trying to balance Carry On ingredients and archetypes with broader material. Patchy at best, though the commitment to the single entendre is almost impressive.

Here’s the trailer

Carry On Doctor (1967, dir. Gerald Thomas)

A faith healer is admitted into hospital. The second medical Carry On (after Nurse, but before Again Doctor and Matron) is a broad farce well-played by a seasoned cast of series regulars and UK TV character actors. A guesting Frankie Howerd offers a little extra too.

Here’s the trailer