Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, dir. George Miller & George Ogilvy)

Max Rockatansky encounters a fledgeling civilisation in the desert. The third (though chronologically fourth, after Fury Road) Mad Max flick is glossier, talkier and generally lighter than its predecessors, but nevertheless works as a hugely detailed action fantasy riffing on Peter Pan and Riddley Walker while delivering a fantastic chase sequence.

In The Tall Grass (2019, dir. Vincenzo Natali)

A pregnant woman and her brother are lured into a field of tall grass. This expansion of the Stephen King/Joe Hill novella begins well, but unravels when fresh material is introduced. Intriguing hints in the original are under-explored, and what’s new confuses rather than deepens. A disappointment, not least from this talented writer/director.

Robin Hood (2018, dir. Otto Bathurst)

A young nobleman turns to crime to thwart a local administrator’s lust for power. Messy (like the 2017 King Arthur) ahistorical retelling, pillaging from other versions and franchises such as The Hunger Games, Assassin’s Creed and The Matrix. Even the casting echoes other, better movies: Star Wars: Rogue One and The Name of the Rose included.

Aquaman (2018, dir. James Wan)

Aquaman/Arthur Curry reluctantly agrees to help prevent a war between the Atlanteans and humanity. Glossy and fun – though overlong and CG-tastic – superhero origin flick. Ugly greenscreen cinematography gets in the way of some decent performances and Wan’s capable direction.

Captain Marvel (2019, dir. Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck)

An alien warrior works to prevent a rival species from gaining a foothold on 1995 Earth. Slow-starting but generally entertaining superhero origin flick, wisely not overdoing its nostalgic comedy; the film’s hampered somewhat by the low-stakes storyline.

Willow (1988, dir. Ron Howard)

An apprentice sorcerer has to protect a prophecied infant saviour from an evil witch. A patchy grab-bag of fantasy tropes enlivened by some spirited playing, a keen visual sense, and some then-groundbreaking effects work. No classic, but OK for undemanding genre fans.

I Kill Giants (2017, dir. Anders Walter)

A misfit teen may or may not be protecting her town from marauding giants. Quirky but generally effective fantasy drama that neatly balances difference and magic. Unusual design and a great central performance, plus unsentimental handling all help.