King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017, dir. Guy Ritchie)

A fantasy-oriented retelling. The second act is fine swashbuckling nonsense, but this version is stuck with lumpen first and third acts which set up unnecessarily complex (and irrelevant) backstory. Still, some fun to be had, and there’s one very neat idea about Excalibur.

The Dark Tower (2017, dir. Nikolaj Arcel)

A fatherless boy is hunted as both the potential saviour and destructor of the multiverse. Impressively-designed and well shot, this is nevertheless an oddly perfunctory and rushed movie, cherrypicking 90 minutes of action from the Stephen King fantasy cycle.

Fancy another point of view? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s review.

Ghostbusters II (1989, dir. Ivan Reitman)

The Ghostbusters have to reunite to battle another supernatural threat to New York. As much a remake of the 1984 original as a sequel, this passable reprise lacks the first film’s freshness, but has a few good lines and performances nevertheless.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi [AKA Episode VIII: The Last Jedi] (2017, dir. Rian Johnson)

The last remnants of the rebellion flee the First Order. Superior eighth instalment of the space opera, daring to ring a few changes on the template re-established by its predecessors while bringing new characters further to the fore.

Other opinions? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s, and here’s Xussia’s.

 

Black Panther (2018, dir. Ryan Coogler)

The new king of a hitherto secret technologically-advanced African nation faces a range of challenges to his accession. Supremely confident addition to the Marvel cinematic canon, which tells its origin story in an Afrofuturist way, ringing many changes on the template.

Thor: Ragnarok (2017, dir Taika Waititi)

Thor and Loki must battle their forgotten sister to regain Asgard. Hugely entertaining and impressively throwaway piece of popcorn tosh. Everyone is having a whale of a time, even if there’s minimal actual story or incident. Lots of fun all round though, especially in the details.

Another perspective? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s take.

The Core (2003, dir. Jon Amiel)

When the earth’s core stops rotating, a mission is assembled to restart it. Enjoyably daft and self-aware big-budget B-movie, with an excellent cast of character actors playing the dopey material with an eye to stay on the right side of camp always.