The Laundromat (2019, dir. Steven Soderbergh)

A widow investigates an insurance company; a complicated web of financial fraud unravels. Superficially similar to The Big Short and Vice in its mix of drama, comedy and mockumentary, The Laundromat offers a clear and accessible primer to the Panama Papers scandal, and to Mossack (Oldman) and Fonseca (Banderas), both gleeful at its heart.

South Seas Adventure [AKA Cinerama’s South Seas Adventure] (1958, dir. Carl Dudley, Richard Goldstone, Francis D Lyon, Walter Thompson, and Basil Wrangell)

A travelogue of the Pacific Rim, with fictionalised elements, incorporating Hawaii, Tahiti, New Zealand, and Australia. A glossy production, typical of its era, presenting a glamorized and stereotypical view for American viewers, while showcasing the Cinerama format. Dated and/or charming, depending on your level of indulgence.

Henchman: The Al Leong Story (2018, dir. Vito Trabucco)

A documentary about Hollywood’s most recognizable stuntman and movie henchman. A crowdfunded production made with affection and respect for its subject. Inevitably for fans, but nevertheless fascinating, not least because the film gives a rounded picture of Leong’s work, life, and personal struggles. Recommended.

Parkland (2013, dir. Peter Landesman)

A dramatisation of the immediate aftermath of the 1963 Kennedy murder. A well-made re-enactment, packed with detail and character actors, though necessarily plotless, and somewhat redundant as a consequence. Effectively shows the chaos of unforeseen situations though.

Kursk: The Last Mission [AKA The Command; AKA Kursk] (2018, dir. Thomas Vinterberg)

A sombre retelling of the 2000 Kursk submarine disaster. Okay drama-documentary that takes some liberties with the actual timeline, and which struggles to make the inevitable dramatic, despite good performances. The usual points made.

Mary Queen of Scots (2018, dir. Josie Rourke)

A dramatisation of the rivalry between Mary of Guise and Elizabeth of England. Goodlooking though talky and obvious historical retelling, neither drama nor straight history lesson. A couple of nice moments, and there’s strength in the visuals and the cast, but the script is the problem here.

Stan & Ollie (2018, dir. Jon S Baird)

The ageing Laurel and Hardy reunite for a UK theatre tour, hopeful that this will restart their movie careers. Straightforward though handsome and respectful biopic of the black-and-white comedy legends, anchored by two exceptional lead performances and genuine affection for its subjects. Recommended.