The Devil Rides Out (a.k.a The Devil’s Bride 1968, Dir. Terence Fisher)

Superior Devil Worshipers vs Good Guys Hammer Horror from stalwart director Fisher. Some fantastic scenes, interwoven with truly odd but brilliant dialogue and an unforgettable appearance from Old Nick. Easily one of the best Hammer films!

Hugo (2011, dir. Martin Scorsese)

A boy lives in a railway station clock. Splendid family adventure, as well as a love letter to early cinema. Scorsese enjoying playing in a new genre and with some fresh cinematic toys, not least the remarkable use of 3D. Hugely recommended.

The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973, dir. Alan Gibson)

In modern-day London, Dracula is behind an establishment conspiracy to unleash a plague epidemic. Modish late series entry, with loads of ideas, and an approach drawing on SF and a Bond villain plot. Fun, within its limitations, and impeccably played.

Bear Island (1979, dir. Don Sharp)

An Arctic scientific expedition is used as cover for different factions searching for old U-boat pens and Nazi gold. Great location work and impressive sets, plus a strong cast, enliven this otherwise-talky thriller adapted from an Alastair MacLean novel.

Dr Terror’s House of Horrors (1965, dir. Freddie Francis)

Five men on a train have their fortunes told by the mysterious Dr Schreck. The first Amicus horror anthology is tremendous, mixing classic tropes with modish 60s pop culture, delivering a suite of chills and thrills backed up by expert playing from an unparalleled ensemble cast.