The Invisible Man (2020, dir. Leigh Whannell)

A domestic abuse survivor believes her supposedly dead ex-partner is still tormenting her. Superior if contrived genre flick that uses its slightly awkward premise to make some relevant points before kicking into full-on gear late on. Not sure the climax plays wholly fair, but the movie works well, in no small part due to smart direction and its lead.

Padre [AKA The Padre] (2018, dir. Jonathan Sobol)

A young Columbian woman partners with an English conman in exchange for help with getting into the US. Decent little road movie/chase thriller with some quirky aspects and excellent location shooting. No game-changer, but a solid cast keeps things moving along.

Brahms: The Boy II (2020, dir. William Brent Bell)

A family recovering from trauma rent a rural property on the grounds where a tragedy occurred. Predictable bloodless jumpscare sequel that struggles to reconfigure its villain, rules and premise from Part I. The dependable Ralph Ineson glowers in support as a gamekeeper.

Extracurricular (2018, dir. Ray Xue)

Four high-achieving teens collaborate on a series of thrill kills; a world-weary cop investigates. Minor but good-looking autumnal horror flick with some smart ideas and fresh approaches to old situations. Works well within its limitations, and achieves its modest ambitions well.

The Boy (2016, dir. William Brent Bell)

An American is hired to nanny the doll replacement of a dead child. Okay spooky house jumpscare horror with a couple of interesting ideas, and some well-worn borrowings, held together by a decent central performance. By no means essential, though, despite all-round proficiency. A sequel followed in 2020.

I, Daniel Blake (2016, dir. Ken Loach)

A middle-aged carpenter falls foul of the UK benefits system. Clear-eyed if slightly dogmatic black comedy-drama which effectively details various struggles in the context of an unwieldy civil service, public sector cuts, the grey economy, and inflexible officialdom. Touches of Kafka counterpoint Loach’s social realist directorial approach.