Jay and Silent Bob Reboot (2019, dir. Kevin Smith)

Jay and Silent Bob take another road trip to Hollywood to stop a remake of a movie about their lives being completed. Sequel/reprise of 2001’s … Strike Back, with more cameos, callouts to other Askewniverse movies, and to fan culture more generally. Fans only, inevitably, but there’s some heart and a couple of decent jokes and neat obscurities among the references.

The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot (2018, dir. Robert D. Krzykowski)

The man who killed Hitler is called upon in old age to track down Bigfoot. Defiantly quirky comedy-drama with horror elements, held together by Sam Elliott’s deadpan central performance and by a sense of confidence throughout. Inevitably not for all, but if you go with it there’s plenty to enjoy.

Mary Poppins Returns (2018, dir. Rob Marshall)

A generation after the events of Mary Poppins, the magical nanny returns to the Banks family, this time to help them save their home. Despite care and affection for the original, this is a reprise rather than a sequel. Emily Blunt lacks the lightness of touch of Julie Andrews, and the songs tend to the unmemorable.

Mary Poppins (1964, dir. Robert Stevenson)

In Edwardian London, a magical nanny aids a family in need. Solid musical comedy with then state-of-the-art animation/live-action hybrid sequences and practical effects. Some great songs, a sense of playfulness, and an iconic central performance. A sequel was made in 2018.

Arthur Christmas (2011, dir. Sarah Smith)

Santa’s awkward younger son has to deliver an overlooked gift so that Christmas can be saved. Excellent, quirky and gently-subversive animation with heart and brains, delivering slapstick, pathos and some flashes of dark humour. Lots to enjoy, including shout-outs to other Aardman characters.

Booksmart (2019, dir. Olivia Wilde)

Awkward best friends decide to let go of their insecurities the night before their high school graduation. Splendid and funny reworking of well-trampled material; a coming-of-age / rite-of-passage / night-from-hell story done right, and both played and directed with a keen sense of the subgenres. Recommended.

6 Underground (2019, dir. Michael Bay)

A tech billionaire finances a vigilante squad dedicated to removing threats to global peace. Well-made fun-but-dumb action-comedy playing to the director’s trademark obsessions and strengths in mashing up Michael Mann and Tony Scott. An auteurist work; spectacular in both the Debordian and the blowing-shit-up-good senses.