Downsizing (2017, dir. Alexander Payne)

A man is forced to re-evaluate his life after volunteering to be miniaturised. Quirky fantasy which can’t work out if it’s social satire, science fiction, or romance, but has a go at all three. Defiantly odd, though, which is no bad thing.

Coco (2017, dir. Lee Unkrich & Adrian Molina)

A boy desperate to become a musician finds himself trapped in the afterlife. Sprightly quest narrative drawing on Mexican folklore; superficial similarity to The Book of Life dampens its impact, though this is a decent Pixar effort in its own right.

Early Man (2018, dir. Nick Park)

A peaceful tribe of cave-dwellers must play football against a Bronze Age crack squad to win back their home. Lovingly-made and beautifully-detailed, this stop-motion flick from Aardman is undemanding fun, even if it’s light on jokes compared to their earlier films.

Galaxy Quest (1999, dir. Dean Parisot)

The former stars of a Star Trek-like TV show are mistaken for genuine space heroes by an alien race searching for saviours. Three Amigos! / A Bug’s Life redux, perhaps, but with excellent casting, a sense of fun, and affection for genre and conventions (of both kinds) throughout.

Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle (2017, dir. Jake Kasdan)

Four teens are transported into an old video game. Contrived but fun sequel to the 1996 movie, which gets a lot of comedy out of its avatar/body-swap shtick, though the actual story is as linear as the games it spoofs. eXistenZ for kids, almost.

Incredibles 2 (2018, dir. Brad Bird)

Elastigirl works to redeem public perception of superheroes, while Mr Incredible wrestles with baby Jack-Jack’s burgeoning powers. Perhaps overlong and overly-similar to the first film, this is nevertheless expertly-designed and executed family entertainment.

Paddington 2 (2017, dir. Paul King)

Paddington ends up in prison after being wrongly convicted of a treasure map theft. Machine-tooled sequel balancing community spirit, slapstick, musical numbers and a climactic train chase. Expertly done, with a fine cast, especially a gleeful Hugh Grant.