Paddleton (2019, dir. Alex Lehmann)

A terminal cancer patient decides to kill himself; he enlists the help of his neighbour and best friend. Gentle black comedy and study of male friendship, with a great brace of understated star performances and some subtlety in its approach. Recommended.

The Jesus Rolls (2019, dir. John Turturro)

Two petty criminals and a hairdresser go on a road trip/crime spree. An odd project – a US remake of Bertrand Blier’s Les Valseuses/Going Places retooled for Turturro’s Quintana character from the Coens’ The Big Lebowski – that inevitably feels like fan fiction. Some minor pleasures along the way; the actors seem to be having fun.

Richard Jewell (2019, dir. Clint Eastwood)

An inadequate security guard becomes the focus of an FBI terrorism enquiry. A stately based-on-a-true-story drama which – despite some clunky telescoping of its story – delivers in character study terms, as well as acknowledging an unconventional hero. Not perfect, but recommended, and with a startling central performance from Paul Walter Hauser.

The Company You Keep (2012, dir. Robert Redford)

A long-underground former radical has to go on the run when his new identity is revealed. Well-made, intelligent political thriller with a cast of character actors to die for. A little low-key for some, maybe, but this is a movie that delivers well on its own terms. Recommended.

The Big Short (2015, dir. Adam McKay)

Drama-documentary explaining the 07/08 financial crash. A chirpy well-cast explainer taking a fourth-wall-tastic approach to explain itself as it goes. Ever-so-slightly pleased with itself, this is nevertheless, fun, entertaining and actually shows how and why what went wrong.

Donnybrook [AKA: Below The Belt: Brawl at Donnybrook] (2018, dir. Tim Sutton)

A bare-knuckle boxer, a meth dealer, and a cop’s lives intersect over drugs, money, and a fight tournament. Lean, autumnal adaptation of the Frank Bill novel. Very different to its source material in tone, but nevertheless a rewarding movie, with something to say about working-class America as well as delivering in genre terms. Recommended.

21 Bridges (2019, dir. Brian Kirk)

A detective shuts down Manhattan to find two cop-killers who’ve stumbled across a cocaine stash. Superior action thriller that – while having no real surprises – manages to work both in dramatic and in gunplay terms. A neat sense of scale, a fine cast, plus good direction all support a solid lead performance.