Casablanca (1942, dir. Michael Curtiz)

A US expat nightclub owner has his neutrality threatened in wartime Morocco when confronted by his ex-lover. Splendid wartime romance/film noir/political allegory balancing cynicism, comedy and menace in equal measure. Loads of fun.

Street Kings (2008, dir. David Ayer)

An alcoholic LA detective with a reputation for violence comes under scrutiny from internal affairs. Generally solid double-cross-tastic bad cop-worse cop rough-and tumble that teeters on the brink of melodrama, but just about holds it together.

Stan & Ollie (2018, dir. Jon S Baird)

The ageing Laurel and Hardy reunite for a UK theatre tour, hopeful that this will restart their movie careers. Straightforward though handsome and respectful biopic of the black-and-white comedy legends, anchored by two exceptional lead performances and genuine affection for its subjects. Recommended.

Death on the Nile (1978, dir. John Guillermin)

Hercule Poirot holidays in Egypt; murder is soon afoot. Quasi-sequel to Murder on the Orient Express. Breezy escapist fun with a rich cast of character actors and bright young things hamming/preening respectively, though its clumsy treatment of non-whites plays as racist rather than as innocent comic relief.

White Boy Rick (2018, dir. Yann Demange)

The true story of Rick Wershe, drug dealer and teen FBI informant. Intriguing spin on the rise-and-fall story, focusing on the latter; good performances, and director Demange again shows he can handle drama, action, genre, character actors and period detail.

Murder on the Orient Express (1974, dir. Sidney Lumet)

Hercule Poirot finds himself in the middle of an elaborate onboard murder. Classy all-star version of the Agatha Christie warhorse. The business of the plot makes in-depth characterisation problematic, but everyone gets their moment to shine, with no resorting to the opening out of the recent Branagh version.

Spy Game (2001, dir. Tony Scott)

A veteran spy on his last day at the CIA works to protect a compromised asset. Slick and confident thriller balancing office politics, espionage and action moments. An entertainment in the sense of the kind of film Graham Greene might have directed in the 2000s.