Canaries (2017, dir. Peter Stray)

A New Years’ party in Wales is the centre of an alien invasion. Low-budget SF/horror/comedy with some oddly irrelevant production values and an overly-complex backstory. Not great at all, but there are a couple of good moments.

 

 

The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973, dir. Alan Gibson)

In modern-day London, Dracula is behind an establishment conspiracy to unleash a plague epidemic. Modish late series entry, with loads of ideas, and an approach drawing on SF and a Bond villain plot. Fun, within its limitations, and impeccably played.

The Ghost of Charnel House [AKA Charnel House] (2016, dir. Craig Moss)

A renovated former slaughterhouse may be haunted by the child of a former serial-killer employee. Overly-complicated horror shenanigans with a couple of effective moments, though undone by its backstory,  poor CG, and some obvious writing.

The Midnight Man (2016, dir. Travis Z)

Three young adults summon a demon. Straightforward jumpscare horror with some surprising gore moments; the rules of the summoning game and the backstory confuse matters, but old pros Lin Shaye and Robert Englund add some class.

Trucks (1997, dir. Chris Thomson)

Vehicles come alive, terrorising travellers hiding out in a rural diner. TV movie version of the same Stephen King short that inspired Maximum Overdrive, with odd gore scenes inserted to make it a horror for international cinema release. Perfunctory.

The Crazies (2010, dir. Breck Eisner)

A viral outbreak in a small Iowa town leads to a zombie-like infection and a military lockdown. Effective and well-sustained remake of the 1973 George Romero flick of the same name. Cynical, paranoid and subversive within its now-familiar genre framework.