Color Out of Space (2019, dir. Richard Stanley)

A meteorite causes hallucinations and mutations to spread across a New England farm. Well-made adaptation of the HP Lovecraft short story. A slow burn that earns its weirdness well, accumulating details carefully, and playing properly with madness. Played commendably straight, though with many subtle genre nods for horror fans.

The Thing (2011, dir. Matthijs van Heijningen Jr)

Members of a Norwegian Antarctic research base find an alien specimen. Prequel/remake of the 1982 John Carpenter-directed movie. Okay as far as it goes, but perfunctory plotting and reliance on CG over practical effects mean this doesn’t really compare, despite good efforts from the cast.

Another viewpoint wanted? We got you.

Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor (2013, dir. Nick Hurran)

The Tenth and Eleventh Doctors face their past, personified. Splendid movie-length episode made in 3D and cinema-released to celebrate the show’s 50th anniversary. A witty time-travel adventure typical of its then-showrunner, made with both love and a keen sense of the show’s heritage. Recommended.

The Invisible Man (2020, dir. Leigh Whannell)

A domestic abuse survivor believes her supposedly dead ex-partner is still tormenting her. Superior if contrived genre flick that uses its slightly awkward premise to make some relevant points before kicking into full-on gear late on. Not sure the climax plays wholly fair, but the movie works well, in no small part due to smart direction and its lead.

Rabid (2019, dir. Jen Soska & Sylvia Soska [AKA The Soska Sisters])

A struggling fashion designer receives an experimental skin graft; she becomes patient zero of a rabies-like epidemic. Uneven but watchable remake of the 1977 David Cronenberg movie (with nods to others). Lots of ideas and directions tried, though not all are followed through; some pleasingly weird moments tho.

Child’s Play (2019, dir. Lars Klevberg)

A smart-tech doll is reprogrammed to malfunction; it develops homicidal tendencies. Generally solid update/reboot of the series with a sense of the daftness of the premise. Works better in the moment than in retrospect, but nasty fun nevertheless, plus a couple of satirical touches.

Godzilla (2014, dir. Gareth Edwards)

Earth is threatened by MUTOs (massive unidentified terrestrial organisms), awoken by human nuclear activity. Superior monster mayhem anchored by a fabulous visual sensibility, and by a genuine feeling of otherness between the creatures and us. Story-light, and a touch serious, but properly spectacular, nevertheless. Sequels ensued.