Flatliners (2017, dir. Niels Arden Oplev)

Medical students investigating near-death experiences find themselves haunted. Slick though bland reprise of the 1990 original; a guesting Kiefer Sutherland is the best thing here in this half-hearted and bloodless horror full of over-age and unlikeable med students.

Escape From LA [AKA John Carpenter’s Escape From LA] (1996, dir. John Carpenter)

Snake Plissken is compelled to rescue a gadget from what is now the island prison of Los Angeles. Campy though large-scale reprise of the 1981 predecessor. Some moments work, but this is lesser Carpenter, and a film blighted by woeful CG.

Men In Black (1997, dir. Barry Sonnenfeld)

An NYPD cop is recruited into a secret anti-alien taskforce. Brisk SF comedy-thriller with some good moments and neat odd-couple playing from its leads, but too concerned with sub-Ghost Busters slapstick than with exploring the potential of its premise.

War for the Planet of the Apes (2017, dir. Matt Reeves)

Caesar comes up against a military leader determined to wipe apes from the planet. Downbeat but impressive third and final part of the trilogy; a more introspective movie than its predecessors but stirring nevertheless.

Another opinion? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s review.

The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997, dir, Steven Spielberg)

A rescue mission to a second island – where the original film’s dinosaurs were engineered – goes awry. Patchy sequel to the original, stronger on set-pieces than on logic or story, with borrowings from a dozen monster movies.

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2017, dir. Luc Besson)

Two elite agents work to uncover a dark secret at the heart of a gigantic space station. Clunkily-scripted and unevenly-acted but undeniably spectacular and well-designed SF fantasy; a $200m auteur piece, for good or ill, and all the better for its distinctiveness.

Another view? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s thoughts.

Blade Runner 2049 (2017, dir. Denis Villeneuve)

A replicant assassin uncovers a decades-old conspiracy. A worthy follow-up to the Ridley Scott classic; 2049 is deliberately-paced, but stunning in places and gorgeous to look at throughout. Recommended.

Fancy another 255 opinion? Here’s Xussia’s take.