Godzilla (2014, dir. Gareth Edwards)

Earth is threatened by MUTOs (massive unidentified terrestrial organisms), awoken by human nuclear activity. Superior monster mayhem anchored by a fabulous visual sensibility, and by a genuine feeling of otherness between the creatures and us. Story-light, and a touch serious, but properly spectacular, nevertheless. Sequels ensued.

Deepstar Six (1988, dir. Sean S. Cunningham)

An undersea naval facility disturbs a monstrous sea creature. Slightly tatty Alien clone trying to steal The Abyss‘s thunder at the late 80s box office. A cast of TV faces and some fun-though-budget model and creature effects help pass the time. One great jumpscare, mind you, and some interesting character details in passing.

Leviathan (1989, dir. George Pan Cosmatos)

A deep-sea mining team encounters a sunken Soviet ship harbouring a mutant organism. Cheesy Alien/The Thing hybrid/ripoff, made to piggyback the release of The Abyss. Perfunctory direction and script, but a couple of neat Stan Winston-designed monster moments and a fine cast of character actors offer some entertainment.

Krull (1983, dir. Peter Yates)

A prince has to rescue a princess to save their world. Oddball SF/fantasy hybrid, riffing on a hundred different fairy tales and genre tropes. Its quest narrative/road movie structure means that it’s inevitably patchy; some dark ideas intrude, though the imagination and budget available are ill-matched, and it’s tonally all over the place.

Matrix Revolutions [AKA The Matrix: Revolutions] (2003, dir. The Wachowskis)

Neo’s battle against Smith and The Machines comes to a head. Third and final part of the Matrix trilogy (a part four is on its way). For series completists only by this stage, though the finale delivers in terms of slightly-humourless comic-book spectacle and epic battles aplenty.

Scrooge (1935, dir. Henry Edwards)

A miser is haunted by a series of ghosts, so he may rethink his approach to Christmas and life. A charming adaptation of the oft-filmed Dickens novella A Christmas Carol, capturing a famous stage portrayal. Some lovely model effects and a keen visual sensibility; a touch of expressionism and a feel for the period on display here.

Hobbs & Shaw [AKA Fast and Furious (Presents): Hobbs & Shaw] (2019, dir. David Leitch)

Mismatched agents team up to prevent a bio-engineered villain from stealing a deadly toxin. Dumb-but-fun-but-dumb again action-comedy sidequel to the later Fast/Furious flicks. Jolly bickering and star cameos help, but the film too-quickly becomes wearying in its CG excesses when it should be at least physics-aware.

Another viewpoint? Here!