As Good As It Gets (1997, dir. James L Brooks)

A selfish author with OCD falls in love with the waitress who serves him breakfast. Splendid romantic comedy with a sharp edge, and a road-trip element. Fine performances from the three leads and a great script. Recommended.

The Terminal (2004, dir. Steven Spielberg)

After a bureaucratic foul-up leaves him stateless, a man is forced to live in an airport terminal. Well-directed comedy-drama which starts brilliantly and then gets bogged down in sub-plots and a shift from existential malaise to schmaltz.

Wall-E (2008, dir. Andrew Stanton)

A beat-up robot falls in love with a sleek new model. Superior SF comedy/romance from Pixar; the last hour is knockabout fun with an environmental/healthy living message, but the first 30 minutes is a sublime silent (apart from music from Hello, Dolly! of all things) movie of its own.

Passengers (2016, dir. Morten Tyldum)

A deep-space vessel malfunctions; a passenger wakes from cryosleep 90 years early. Odd SF flick which initially plays interestingly with The Shining in space, only to default to creepy romance mode which doesn’t work at all; Act 3 shows evidence of much surgery.

Another opinion? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s thoughts.

Always (1989, dir. Steven Spielberg)

A dead pilot returns to allow his former partner to move on with her life. A patchy and sentimental piece (remaking 1943’s A Guy Named Joe), happier in its flying, comic and firefighting action sequences than with the emotional scenes; some pleasures to be had, tho.

10 Things I Hate About You (1999, dir. Gil Junger)

US high-school revisioning of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. Effective and funny throughout with just enough Bard to justify its existence, and a slew of breakout performances, though most credit goes to the sublime Larry Miller as an overprotective dad.

Flirting With Love (AKA Loitering With Intent) (2014, dir. Adam Rapp)

Two wannabe screenwriters try to get their heads together in the countryside. Shambling indie comedy-drama which doesn’t really go anywhere  – which is kinda the point – though is at least mercifully brief.