Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor (2013, dir. Nick Hurran)

The Tenth and Eleventh Doctors face their past, personified. Splendid movie-length episode made in 3D and cinema-released to celebrate the show’s 50th anniversary. A witty time-travel adventure typical of its then-showrunner, made with both love and a keen sense of the show’s heritage. Recommended.

Zombieland: Double Tap (2019, dir. Ruben Fleischer)

Ten years after the events of Zombieland; tensions split the group, but new threats emerge.  Horror-comedy z-sequel that offers pretty much the same as before, though with inevitably diminished returns. Fine for those who liked the first one, though there’s little here for anyone else.

VFW (2020, dir. Joe Begos)

A group of veterans defend their bar from a violent drug gang. Gory, well-cast homage to early John Carpenter flicks (and by extension Rio Bravo). A game cast have fun, everyone’s in on the joke, and it’s good to see these vets have meaty roles. Doesn’t overstay its welcome, neither.

Spenser Confidential (2020, dir. Peter Berg)

A Boston ex-cop, fresh from jail, partners with his new roommate to unravel the conspiracy that led to his imprisonment. A loose adaptation of a post-Robert B Parker Spenser novel, and not a good one. A by-the-numbers comedy thriller that doesn’t do its characters justice, despite a decent cast.

Terminator: Dark Fate (2019, dir. Tim Miller)

A young woman is targeted for termination; an augmented soldier is sent as a protector. This alt-timeline sequel (ignoring all but the first two films) is for series fans only. Some OK action, nice ideas and good jokes, but no purpose, some handwavey plotting, and too much weightless CG tomfoolery instead of grounded mayhem.

Here’s another review.

Into The Ashes (2019, dir. Aaron Harvey)

A former criminal’s past life catches up with him, when old associates track him down and kill his wife. Effective low-key and slow-burn thriller with a solid cast of character actors making the most of the material. A good sense of blue-collar life, and of the inevitable consequences of revenge.

Primal (2019, dir. Nicholas Powell)

A washed-up game hunter transports a white jaguar on a cargo ship also carrying an assassin to the US for trial. Contrived but fun – though perhaps surprisingly modest – high concept Die Hard-meets-Red Dragon-meets-Con Air-ish DTV thriller with a great slumming cast, some decent CG work, and a couple of OK plot wrinkles.