Hold Your Breath [AKA Dans La Brume / Just A Breath Away] (2018, dir. Daniel Roby)

A toxic gas of unknown origin fills Paris; an estranged couple with a sick daughter try to survive. Clever and surprisingly emotional apocalyptic thriller, making the most of its premise and the chance to focus on relationships as much as plot-driving missions. Well worth your time.

Brightburn (2019, dir. David Yarovesky)

An adopted boy finds out that he is an alien when his superpowers are triggered by puberty. Its neat inversion of the Superman origin story notwithstanding, Brightburn doesn’t quite know what to do with its premise, or with the horror route it takes. Nevertheless, an interesting minor film, with an eye for small-town detail.

Fancy another point of view? Here you go. Oh, and here.

31 (2016, dir. Rob Zombie)

A travelling vanload of carnival workers find themselves kidnapped and forced to play a sadistic Halloween game. Zombie’s love of sideshow freaks and 70s road movies pays dividends here, in a Saw meets Funhouse kinda way. Doesn’t quite gel, but some striking moments and imagery, plus in Richard Brake, the movies find their next Joker.

Little Monsters (2019, dir. Abe Forsythe)

A loser musician and a kindergarten teacher defend a class visiting a petting zoo from zombies. Sprightly horror-comedy which balances humour, romance, gross-out violence and crassness in expert measure. Loads of fun, some heart, some songs, and a selection of great gags. Recommended.

Cat People (1942, dir. Jacques Tourneur)

A Serbian woman in New York fears she cannot love because of an ancient curse. Tremendous noir/horror hybrid, taking inspiration from werewolf archetypes. Huge amounts of fun, breathtaking in its economy, and with some great suspense set-pieces. Highly recommended. A sequel – The Curse of the Cat People – followed in 1944.

Hellboy (2019, dir. Neil Marshall)

Hellboy battles an ancient sorceress from Arthurian legend. Famously-troubled shooting and post-production bedevilled this fantasy horror series reboot, which as a consequence is all over the place. Some good stuff, but its awkward storytelling is patched with flashbacks, dubbed dialogue, variable FX, overlength; the works. A shame.

Terror of All Hallow’s Eve (2017, dir. Todd Tucker)

A bullied horror-obsessed teen conjures a trickster demon who promises to grant him his revenge wishes. By-the-numbers Halloween-set teen-oriented flick that’s keen to pay homage in different ways to early John Carpenter movies. Well-enough done within its limitations, even if it offers nothing new.