Rogue (2020, dir. MJ Bassett)

A hostage extraction team is hunted across the East African savannah by vengeful kidnappers, and by a lion escaped from illegal breeders. Efficient DTV actioner with horror elements maximising location shooting production values while cheerfully stealing bits of business from all over: plus a Backstreet Boys running gag.

Here’s the trailer.

Becky (2020, dir. Jonathan Milott & Cary Murnion)

A disaffected teenager takes revenge on the neo-Nazi prison escapees who take over her family’s holiday property. Slightly too clever for its own good, the movie nevertheless gets going once its plot is clear, and delivers in terms of splattery grue, even if it’s unsure what to do with loose ends.

Here’s the trailer.

The Domestics (2018, dir. Mike P Nelson)

A dysfunctional couple travel across post-apocalyptic America through territory populated by rival murderous gangs. Interesting small-scale action/horror hybrid with an unusual focus on character development and on telling detail. Plenty to appreciate despite the familiarity of its Mad Max-meets-The Purge setup.

Here’s the trailer.

Frozen (2010, dir. Adam Green)

Three friends are trapped on a ski-lift. And that’s it: a well-sustained little horror/suspense piece that looks great throughout and makes the most of its outdoors spin on the trapped-in-a-lift premise. Some fine tense sequences, and genuine eeww moments, too.

Here’s the trailer.

Hunted (2020, dir. Vincent Paronnaud)

A female executive is kidnapped by two men: she escapes and a pursuit begins. Thrilling, fascinating riff on Red Riding Hood with folk horror and mythic as well as more straightforward night-from-hell elements. Well-sustained and managed throughout, with a handful of moments of genius. Recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Sputnik (2020, dir. Egor Abramenko)

1983: a Soviet cosmonaut returns to Earth harbouring a parasite. Very watchable Alien/Quatermass Experiment hybrid, balancing SF horror with a developing romance and a modernist visual sensibility. Doesn’t add much to what we’ve seen before, perhaps, but distinctive in feel and look nevertheless.

Here’s the trailer.

Downrange (2017, dir. Ryuhei Kitamura)

A carload of young adults are trapped on a deserted road by a sniper. Excellent and well-sustained horror/thriller hybrid. Act three is slightly fudged, but overall this is an impressive bit of genre filmmaking that plays fair, maximises the potential of its premise, and delivers in gore and thrills terms. Recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

The Pale Door (2020, dir. Aaron B Koontz)

After a train heist goes unexpectedly awry, outlaws find themselves pitched against supernatural forces. Fun little Western/horror hybrid that’s basically From Dusk Till Dawn with witches and horses. A strong cast of character actors helps, as does interesting detail and a couple of weird gross-out moments.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn VI [AKA Wrong Turn 6: Last Resort] (2014, dir. Valeri Milev)

A young man and his friends arrive at a remote spa hotel: he has inherited the property, but it comes with family complications. A partial reboot that tries a few new things, though soon defaults to the boobs, blood, and inbreeds usual. A further reboot is promised for 2021.

Here’s the trailer.

Wrong Turn 5 [AKA Wrong Turn 5: Bloodlines] (2013, dir. Declan O’Brien)

Festival-bound students and a small-town sheriff come up against a patriarch and the cannibal brothers he leads. Nigh-plotless fifth instalment (briefly flirting with reprising Rio Bravo), linking Part 4 to the original. Doug Bradley is fun, but this is a series low to date. Has that shot-in-Bulgaria feel.

Here’s the trailer.