The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot (2018, dir. Robert D. Krzykowski)

The man who killed Hitler is called upon in old age to track down Bigfoot. Defiantly quirky comedy-drama with horror elements, held together by Sam Elliott’s deadpan central performance and by a sense of confidence throughout. Inevitably not for all, but if you go with it there’s plenty to enjoy.

The Curse of La Llorona [AKA The Curse of the Weeping Woman] (2019, dir. Michael Chaves)

LA, 1973. A cursed social services worker has her family stalked by a vengeful child-killing spirit. Competent jump-scare horror with links to the Conjuring universe. Some decent period details, solid character actors galore, and a few well-engineered shocks. All-but-bloodless fare, but entertaining enough.

Godzilla (2014, dir. Gareth Edwards)

Earth is threatened by MUTOs (massive unidentified terrestrial organisms), awoken by human nuclear activity. Superior monster mayhem anchored by a fabulous visual sensibility, and by a genuine feeling of otherness between the creatures and us. Story-light, and a touch serious, but properly spectacular, nevertheless. Sequels ensued.

Deepstar Six (1988, dir. Sean S. Cunningham)

An undersea naval facility disturbs a monstrous sea creature. Slightly tatty Alien clone trying to steal The Abyss‘s thunder at the late 80s box office. A cast of TV faces and some fun-though-budget model and creature effects help pass the time. One great jumpscare, mind you, and some interesting character details in passing.

Leviathan (1989, dir. George Pan Cosmatos)

A deep-sea mining team encounters a sunken Soviet ship harbouring a mutant organism. Cheesy Alien/The Thing hybrid/ripoff, made to piggyback the release of The Abyss. Perfunctory direction and script, but a couple of neat Stan Winston-designed monster moments and a fine cast of character actors offer some entertainment.

Pledge (2018, dir. Daniel Robbins)

Five outsiders find themselves undergoing a bizarre hazing ritual to join a college fraternity. Well-sustained minor horror flick that maximises a small cast and a single location. Doesn’t have much to say, and it’s not exactly fun, but a useful calling-card pic; there’s some potential on show here.

The Final Destination [AKA Final Destination 4 / Final Destination 3D] (2009, dir. David R Ellis)

After his premonition saves his friends and others, a student foresees the deaths of the survivors of a speedway disaster. Tatty continuation developing the foresight plotline, but with variable CG effects engineered for 3D. One sequence riffs on a notorious Chuck Palahniuk story. The least of the series, which rebounded with the superior next/last instalment.