Polaroid (2019, dir. Lars Klevberg)

A teenager comes into possession of a vintage Polaroid camera; its images provoke a series of supernatural killings. Low-key though good-looking teen horror flick, borrowing from the Final Destination and Ring franchises, among many others. Nothing new apart from the calling-card approach by Klevberg (extending a 2015 short film of his), who then helmed the Child’s Play reboot.

Haunt (2019, dir. Scott Beck & Bryan Woods)

Six students visit a pop-up Halloween haunted house attraction. Straightforward series-of-traps body count flick, riffing on Saw sequels, escape room popularity, and a bunch of other influences. Some agreeably nasty ideas, and a cast of relative unknowns (to me, anyway) that help make matters unpredictable.

Annabelle Comes Home (2019, dir. Gary Dauberman)

Babysitters working for The Warrens meddle with cursed artefacts, summoning a range of demonic entities. Okay series entry/sequel working to tie together the convoluted Conjuring franchise; slight on story, but some effective jumps, neat period details, and an appealing cast.

Rabid (2019, dir. Jen Soska & Sylvia Soska [AKA The Soska Sisters])

A struggling fashion designer receives an experimental skin graft; she becomes patient zero of a rabies-like epidemic. Uneven but watchable remake of the 1977 David Cronenberg movie (with nods to others). Lots of ideas and directions tried, though not all are followed through; some pleasingly weird moments tho.

Child’s Play (2019, dir. Lars Klevberg)

A smart-tech doll is reprogrammed to malfunction; it develops homicidal tendencies. Generally solid update/reboot of the series with a sense of the daftness of the premise. Works better in the moment than in retrospect, but nasty fun nevertheless, plus a couple of satirical touches.

The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot (2018, dir. Robert D. Krzykowski)

The man who killed Hitler is called upon in old age to track down Bigfoot. Defiantly quirky comedy-drama with horror elements, held together by Sam Elliott’s deadpan central performance and by a sense of confidence throughout. Inevitably not for all, but if you go with it there’s plenty to enjoy.

The Curse of La Llorona [AKA The Curse of the Weeping Woman] (2019, dir. Michael Chaves)

LA, 1973. A cursed social services worker has her family stalked by a vengeful child-killing spirit. Competent jump-scare horror with links to the Conjuring universe. Some decent period details, solid character actors galore, and a few well-engineered shocks. All-but-bloodless fare, but entertaining enough.