As Above, So Below (2014, dir. John Erick Dowdle)

A driven archaeologist and crew investigate the Paris catacombs for a sacred alchemical relic. Decent location work, a photogenic cast, and a couple of unsettling early moments make promises that the movie can’t quite sustain, setting for straightforward face-your-demons stuff but no real story answers.

Here’s the trailer.

The Void (2016, dir. Steven Kostanski & Jeremy Gillespie)

A closing-down hospital comes under siege from cultists outside, and from monsters within. 80s-tastic lo-fi splattery horror, riffing on multiple John Carpenter movies and others, not least Phantasm. Plenty of fun in its own right, even if it tends to go for striking images over consistency in character and story terms.

Here’s the trailer.

And here’s Lemonsquirtle’s review.

Urban Legends: Bloody Mary (2005, dir. Mary Lambert)

Students inadvertently conjure the spirit of a murdered alumnus: deaths ensue. DTV threequel taking a supernatural revenge rather than a whodunnit route. While thieving from multiple genre properties (including a kill lifted from Final Destination 2) there’s some agreeably gruesome moments, plus early appearances from Kate and Rooney Mara.

Here’s the trailer.

After Midnight [AKA Something Else] (2019, dir. Jeremy Gardner & Christian Stella)

Struggling with the breakup of a long-term relationship, a man is visited nightly by a monster. Smart romantic drama/horror hybrid, with lots going for it in a lo-fi indie kinda way. Makes you wonder what Gardner and Co will come up with next. Recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Alien Parasite [AKA The Dustwalker] (2020, dir. Sandra Sciberras)

A remote Australian desert township is attacked by extraterrestrial parasitic organisms. SF/horror that has a pleasing Outback Western feel and which starts well, but soon descends into badly-scripted and underpowered wholescale genre theft. A shame, as there’s glimmers of a much better film here.

Here’s the trailer.

Urban Legends: Final Cut [AKA Urban Legend 2; Urban Legends: The Final Cut] (2000, dir. John Ottman)

A serial killer stalks a group of film students. Tenuous (and only vaguely urban legend-ish) sequel that has fun moments and a couple of neat movie shout-outs, but which is unscary, not gory, is illogical, and has few characters to root for. The whodunnit angle gets lost in the process. A third movie followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Urban Legend (1998, dir. Jamie Blanks)

A serial killer stalks a campus, the killings inspired by urban legends. Generally satisfactory self-aware post-Scream whodunnit/slasher hybrid with pretensions to John Carpenter, though light on scares and grue, and clumsy in terms of representation. Fun support from stalwarts Robert Englund, Brad Dourif and Julian Ritchings helps. Two sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Hollow Man (2000, dir. Paul Verhoeven)

An arrogant scientist unleashes his dark side when invisibility experiments go wrong. While lacking the satiric edge of Verhoeven’s best US SF-infused work, this is still a fun, well-resourced and knowingly sleazy horror flick, with all involved operating effectively, showcasing still-impressive effects work..

Here’s the trailer.

House of the Witch (2017, dir. Alex Merkin)

A group of teens spend Halloween in a deserted mansion with a reputation for being haunted. Modest horror pic with some invention within the limitations of the set-up. Some gooey practical effects work and an ending that pays off well, even if the middle hour is largely plotless.

Here’s the trailer.

Friday the 13th (2009, dir. Marcus Nispel)

Two groups of students spend weekends by a deserted summer camp; murders ensue. Clunky attempted series reboot/sidequel with perfunctory handling, and a focus on hunk/hottie/stoner soap operatics rather than story or logic. Not much good, to be honest.

Here’s the trailer.