The Ghost of Charnel House [AKA Charnel House] (2016, dir. Craig Moss)

A renovated former slaughterhouse may be haunted by the child of a former serial-killer employee. Overly-complicated horror shenanigans with a couple of effective moments, though undone by its backstory,  poor CG, and some obvious writing.

The Midnight Man (2016, dir. Travis Z)

Three young adults summon a demon. Straightforward jumpscare horror with some surprising gore moments; the rules of the summoning game and the backstory confuse matters, but old pros Lin Shaye and Robert Englund add some class.

Trucks (1997, dir. Chris Thomson)

Vehicles come alive, terrorising travellers hiding out in a rural diner. TV movie version of the same Stephen King short that inspired Maximum Overdrive, with odd gore scenes inserted to make it a horror for international cinema release. Perfunctory.

The Crazies (2010, dir. Breck Eisner)

A viral outbreak in a small Iowa town leads to a zombie-like infection and a military lockdown. Effective and well-sustained remake of the 1973 George Romero flick of the same name. Cynical, paranoid and subversive within its now-familiar genre framework.

Cabin Fever (2016, dir. Travis Z)

Five students rent a cabin in the woods and become exposed to a flesh-eating contagion. One splendid Grand Guignol moment aside, this is a duff remake of a not-especially-good recent horror, ticking off all the cliches The Cabin In The Woods subverted.

Nightbreed (1990, dir. Clive Barker)

A young man is troubled by visions of monsters, and of a place called Midian. Ambitious but confusingly-told fantasy/horror hybrid with plenty going on, and lots of ideas, though not all of them well-executed enough to make for a fully-coherent movie.

The Birds (1963, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)

A coastal Californian is attacked without warning by swarms of birds. One of the last truly great Hitchcock movies, full of suspenseful set-pieces, an absence of explanation, and an apocalyptic climax. Recommended.