10 to Midnight (1983, dir. J Lee Thompson)

A veteran cop is determined to bring a multiple-murder suspect to justice. Lumpen sub-Dirty Harry horror-thriller, blending police procedural with slasher pic. Despite an interesting approach to its villain, this is straightforward exploitation fare, its director’s and star’s former glories notwithstanding.

Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, dir. George Miller & George Ogilvy)

Max Rockatansky encounters a fledgeling civilisation in the desert. The third (though chronologically fourth, after Fury Road) Mad Max flick is glossier, talkier and generally lighter than its predecessors, but nevertheless works as a hugely detailed action fantasy riffing on Peter Pan and Riddley Walker while delivering a fantastic chase sequence.

Ready or Not (2019, dir. Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett)

On her wedding day, a bride finds that the games dynasty she’s marrying into has an odd – and potentially murderous – ritual. Generally solid black comedy horror with a great lead performance from Samara Weaving. Bonus points for the gratuitous Kazuo Ishiguro shoutout.

In The Tall Grass (2019, dir. Vincenzo Natali)

A pregnant woman and her brother are lured into a field of tall grass. This expansion of the Stephen King/Joe Hill novella begins well, but unravels when fresh material is introduced. Intriguing hints in the original are under-explored, and what’s new confuses rather than deepens. A disappointment, not least from this talented writer/director.

Alien Resurrection (1997, dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet)

200 years after the events of Alien 3, Ripley is cloned by military scientists eager to weaponise the xenomorph. Good-looking and humorous Part 4 with an excellent cast of character actors; tonal inconsistency and a wayward third act destabilise the storytelling. The compulsion to find new twists undoes some of the excellent earlier material presented here.

Us (2019, dir. Jordan Peele)

A family on holiday is terrorised by doppelgangers. Initially slow-burning, but ultimately incendiary horror movie with a few satirical flourishes, and brains as well as blood. Repays multiple viewings, and close attention throughout. Recommended.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s.

Event Horizon (1997, dir. Paul WS Anderson)

A search and rescue vessel investigates a fabled spaceship, thought lost. Generally effective Alien/The Shining mash-up, grounding its horror shenanigans with working guy space freighter ordinariness. Doesn’t make a lick of sense once the plot kicks in, but works just fine as a gory rollercoaster ride.