Swordfish (2001, dir. Dominic Sena)

A brilliant ex-hacker is coerced into a heist being orchestrated by a paramilitary group. Glossy but dumb-as-rocks tech thriller with the usual hacking visual cliches and an eye on spectacle (Bullet-time explosions! Nudity! A bus in midair!) over logic.

A Christmas Horror Story (2015, dir. Grant Harvey, Steven Hoban & Brett Sullivan)

Four linked horror stories take place on the same Christmas Eve. Reasonable anthology held together┬áby William Shatner’s drunk radio jock. Plenty of contemporary horror tropes dealt with: changelings, zombies, Krampus, spooky dormitory found-footage.

The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992, dir. Brian Henson)

A faithful adaptation of the Dickens novella, with the muppets cast plus Michael Caine as Scrooge. Good songs (by Paul Williams), Dickens – The Great Gonzo – acts as narrator, and an excellent Caine performance; he plays it admirably straight throughout, and delivers perhaps the finest single line-reading in cinema history.

Casino Royale (2006, dir. Martin Campbell)

Bond battles a private banker for terrorists. Casino Royale does a lot of things well: a series reboot, an introduction to the Daniel Craig era, and a film that connects to its source novel. It goes on too long, with perhaps one ending too many, but this one of the strongest series entries.

Bright (2017, dir. David Ayer)

A veteran LA cop partners with the first orc officer; they find themselves in the middle of an ancient magic war. While the procedural and mismatched partners stuff is great, Bright is saddled with too much backstory and a daft third act. Feels like a big-budget TV series pilot.