The Debt Collector (2018, dir. Jesse V. Johnson)

A desperate-for-money martial arts instructor takes a job as a  debt collector. Okay thick ear, with a fight every 5 minutes and some comic moments. Old-school in many ways, and with a tacked-on plot that doesn’t quite work, but reasonable fun for fisticuffs fans.

Murder On The Orient Express (2017, dir. Kenneth Branagh)

Hercule Poirot must investigate a killing on a sumptuous cross-Europe train. Handsome and starry, this Agatha Christie adaptation struggles to showcase its cast or its plot, so while not-entertaining, feels a bit mechanical.

Molly’s Game (2017, dir. Aaron Sorkin)

The true story of Molly Bloom, who ran high-stakes poker games in New York and LA. Excellent drama, balanced by a fine central performance and swaggering writing, chronicling a perhaps typical rise and fall-style story, but done with class and confidence.

Alternative view here

The Taking of Pelham 123 (2009, dir. Tony Scott)

A ruthless crew hijacks a New York subway train. Glossy but stirring second remake of the 1970s Walter Matthau/Robert Shaw classic. Inevitably the movie is opened up to the story’s detriment, but this is nevertheless an exciting and well-played flick.

101 Dalmations II: Patch’s London Adventure (2003, dir. Jim Kammerud & Brian Smith)

Cruella de Vil attempts again to steal and kill the puppies; one dog stands alone. OK straight-to-DVD sequel, heavy on London cliches, slapstick, and cutesy pooches. No classic, certainly, but inoffensive fun nevertheless.

Incredibles 2 (2018, dir. Brad Bird)

Elastigirl works to redeem public perception of superheroes, while Mr Incredible wrestles with baby Jack-Jack’s burgeoning powers. Perhaps overlong and overly-similar to the first film, this is nevertheless expertly-designed and executed family entertainment.

The Commuter (2018, dir. Jaume Collet-Serra)

A just-sacked salesman is coerced into finding a witness on his train home. Contrived but fun single-location thriller from Neeson/Collet-Serra (their 4th collaboration). Well-stocked with sneaky character actors, and there’s a third-act moment of wonder. Enjoyable tosh.

Another perspective required? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s POV.