Assassination Nation (2018, dir. Sam Levinson)

Four high school girls are targeted by a vigilante posse after a data hack tears a town apart. Stylish and confident Trump-era satire, equal parts The Purge sequels and God Bless America. More set-up than an actual fully-fledged movie, this nevertheless has lots to recommend it if you go with it.

Parkland (2013, dir. Peter Landesman)

A dramatisation of the immediate aftermath of the 1963 Kennedy murder. A well-made re-enactment, packed with detail and character actors, though necessarily plotless, and somewhat redundant as a consequence. Effectively shows the chaos of unforeseen situations though.

Colors (1988, dir. Dennis Hopper)

A veteran and a rookie struggle to work together while patrolling LA’s gang neighbourhoods. Still-influential drama that tries for nuance while establishing the look and tone of two generations of movies. Worth revisiting, not least for its direction, cinematography, and its Herbie Hancock score.

Running Scared (1986, dir. Peter Hyams)

Two Chicago cops vow to bring down a drug dealer before their early retirement to Florida. None-more-80s buddy cop comedy-thriller, bolstered by engaging leads with real charisma, and with great cinematography. Dated in places, and the script’s riddled with genre and other cliches.

Triple Threat (2019, dir. Jesse V Johnson)

Mercenaries accidentally free a terrorist. This gleeful team-up of multiple DTV action stars doesn’t quite hang together in story terms, but there’s no doubting the fun to be had if shootouts, martial arts combat and fistfights are your thing.

Daughter of the Wolf (2019, dir. David Hackl)

A mother trackers her son’s kidnappers across a snowy wilderness. Okay DTV thriller with some decent production values but a perfunctory plot and awkward action direction. Richard Dreyfuss offers up some enjoyable supporting ham.

Point Blank (2019, dir. Joe Lynch)

A trainee doctor is forced to go on the run with an escaped prisoner. Straightforward chase thriller that holds itself together via its lead performances. The usual double-crosses and switches, though the movie undercuts its committed leads with some awkward comedic juxtapositions and musical cues.