Becky (2020, dir. Jonathan Milott & Cary Murnion)

A disaffected teenager takes revenge on the neo-Nazi prison escapees who take over her family’s holiday property. Slightly too clever for its own good, the movie nevertheless gets going once its plot is clear, and delivers in terms of splattery grue, even if it’s unsure what to do with loose ends.

Here’s the trailer.

The Doorman (2020, dir. Ryuhei Kitamura)

A troubled ex-soldier takes on a menial job, but soon finds themselves in the middle of a heist. Contrived action thriller happy to recycle Die Hard on a budget, but bringing nothing new to the table. A disappointment from the usually-flamboyant Kitamura, not even bothering with his usual gory glee.

Here’s the trailer.

El Robo del Siglo [AKA The Heist of the Century] (2020, dir. Ariel Winograd)

An Argentinian artist and his associates plan to rob a bank. Fast, funny and stylish comedy-suspense thriller, based on a true story. Lots of fun and no little swagger to it: recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Evil Under The Sun (1982, dir. Guy Hamilton)

Investigating a stolen jewel, Poirot finds himself at a luxury resort where there is murder afoot. An if-it-ain’t-broke sequel to Death On The Nile, though this time with the camp dialled right up. Solid cast, a fancy isolated location, a puzzle to solve, no-one taking things too seriously.

Here’s the trailer.

Murder on the Orient Express (1974, dir. Sidney Lumet)

Hercule Poirot must investigate a killing on a luxury sleeper service. Handsome if slightly stagey and camp version of the Agatha Christie stalwart. An awkward backstory and too many starry suspects make for tricky telescoping of the novel, but fans won’t mind a bit.

Here’s the trailer. And a previous review.

The Yakuza (1974, dir. Sydney Pollack)

A former detective returns to Japan from the US: an old friend’s daughter under threat. Neither quite a neo-noir, an action thriller or a study of overseas crime syndicates, The Yakuza tries to be all three with variable results. Slow, but interesting, with flashes of a darker, better, and more violent film lurking.

Here’s the trailer.

Army Of One (2020, dir. Stephen Dunham)

An ex-special forces soldier takes on the matriarchal backwoods criminal clan who killed her husband. Effective DTV vehicle that maximises limited resources, showcasing Ellen Hollman well. Plenty of unpretentious fisticuffs fun: sharper script and direction, and this would have been a minor classic.

Here’s the trailer.

The Pale Door (2020, dir. Aaron B Koontz)

After a train heist goes unexpectedly awry, outlaws find themselves pitched against supernatural forces. Fun little Western/horror hybrid that’s basically From Dusk Till Dawn with witches and horses. A strong cast of character actors helps, as does interesting detail and a couple of weird gross-out moments.

Here’s the trailer.

Collide (2016, dir. Eran Creevy)

An American car thief in Berlin commits to a heist to fund his girlfriend’s kidney transplant. Straightforward chase thriller that takes an age to get going. There’s some good direction, and supporting villains Hopkins and Kingsley are fun, but the script is rote, foregrounding coincidences rather than ingenuity.

Here’s the trailer.

Faster (2010, Dir. George Tillman Jr.)

An ex-con seeks revenge on gang that killed his brother. Early Dwayne Johnson vehicle that throws story logic out of the window in favour of plot contrivance. Nothing new to offer but nicely shot – with clear intentions to show Johnson off as more than an ex-wrestler.

Faster (2010, Dir. George Tillman Jr.)