Thunder Force (2021, dir. Ben Falcone)

Mismatched former best friends become superheroes after a laboratory mishap. Perhaps the most perfunctorily-plotted movie in recent history. McCarthy reprises her brash/embarrassed working class schtick, and there’s a few decent song-based jokes. A strong cast helps: Jason Bateman’s enjoying himself.

Here’s the trailer.

Die Hard 4.0 [AKA Live Free or Die Hard] (2007, dir. Len Wiseman)

John McClane and a young hacker track down a cyberterrorist. Fourth time out, the franchise has been retooled for pan-generational appeal, with muted levels of violence/language to suit. That said, it’s an entertaining analogue v digital thriller, with all digi-tropes present and some panache in the action design.

Here’s the trailer.

Galveston (2018, dir. Mélanie Laurent)

A dying criminal finds himself on the run with a young woman. Smart, low key hardscrabble crime drama from the Nic Pizzalatto novel. Can’t quite decide to go for arthouse or for jailhouse, but worth your time nevertheless.

Here’s the trailer.

Echo Boomers (2020, dir. Seth Savoy)

A young man is recruited by this Chicago-based cousin for a series of art heists. Okay though too-slick-for-its-own-good thievery thriller, enlivened by a Michael Shannon supporting role and by some confidence in its execution, despite a lack of actual story.

Here’s the trailer.

Welcome to Sudden Death (2020, dir. Dallas Jackson)

An ex-forces security guard takes on hi-tech thieves during a basketball game. Straightforward DTV reprise of the 1995 Peter Hyams/Van Damme minor action classic: Michael Jai White is as charismatic as ever, and while the movie’s not great, it delivers lo-fi fisticuffs, some OK jokes, and a couple of neat ideas.

Here’s the trailer.

Concrete Plans (2020, dir. Will Jewell)

Resentments build when a building crew working on a remote Welsh farm go unpaid. Slow-burn horror/thriller with solid performances from unshowy character actors. Pacing and some iffy scripting are issues in the first half, but when the movie gets going it delivers in dramatic and genre terms.

Here’s the trailer.

I Care a Lot (2020, Dir. J. Blakeson)

A shark like con artist tricks an OAP out of her home and savings only to discover her victim has hidden criminal connections. Deliciously black comedy, with great casting and well written script. Everyone is having a great time here and the result is watchable, thrilling and at times infuriating!

I Care a Lot (2020, Dir. J. Blakeson)

Becky (2020, dir. Jonathan Milott & Cary Murnion)

A disaffected teenager takes revenge on the neo-Nazi prison escapees who take over her family’s holiday property. Slightly too clever for its own good, the movie nevertheless gets going once its plot is clear, and delivers in terms of splattery grue, even if it’s unsure what to do with loose ends.

Here’s the trailer.

The Doorman (2020, dir. Ryuhei Kitamura)

A troubled ex-soldier takes on a menial job, but soon finds themselves in the middle of a heist. Contrived action thriller happy to recycle Die Hard on a budget, but bringing nothing new to the table. A disappointment from the usually-flamboyant Kitamura, not even bothering with his usual gory glee.

Here’s the trailer.

El Robo del Siglo [AKA The Heist of the Century] (2020, dir. Ariel Winograd)

An Argentinian artist and his associates plan to rob a bank. Fast, funny and stylish comedy-suspense thriller, based on a true story. Lots of fun and no little swagger to it: recommended.

Here’s the trailer.