The Irishman [AKA I Heard You Paint Houses] (2019, dir. Martin Scorsese)

A now-aged mob hitman reflects. A stunning revisiting of themes preoccupying Scorsese throughout his career; gang life, organised crime, Catholic guilt. Sombre and melancholy, and Ellroy-like in its alt-history approach to the American 20th century. A technical, dramatic and stylistic marvel, with fine performances all around, none less than from Pesci, who’s revelatory here. Hugely recommended.

Overdrive (2017, dir. Antonio Negret)

Two car-criminal brothers have to steal a rare sports car to repay a debt. Glossy, slick, and glamorous escapist entertainment made with some skill. Indebted to Gone in 60 Seconds / Fast & Furious flicks, with a dash of Europacorp-ish South of France style. Fun while it’s on, and good-looking throughout.

Miss Bala (2019, dir. Catherine Hardwicke)

A young woman caught up in a nightclub shooting has to go undercover against a cartel. While its focus on people rather than action is perhaps commendable, this US remake of the 2011 Spanish-language original isn’t dramatic enough to deliver suspense, or feisty enough to please gunplay fans, despite a committed central performance.

The Mule (2018, dir. Clint Eastwood)

An elderly man becomes a drugs runner for a cartel. Crime drama based on a true story. Baggy and indulgent in places, but with some charming moments, and a decent lead performance from Eastwood. The script’s the issue; we never quite get to the heart of the character, despite efforts to tell a rounded story.

Cold Pursuit (2019, dir. Hans Petter Moland)

A snowplough driver seeks revenge on the drug dealers who killed his son. Black comedy English-language remake of the director’s 2014 In Order of Disappearance/Kraftidioten. Lacks the transgressive edge of the original; a good cast doesn’t have much to do.

Superfly (2018, dir. Director X)

A Georgia drug dealer tries for one last score to get out of the life. Okay remake/reprise that’s more style than substance, too often simply presenting the genre tropes than doing much useful with them. Some interesting moments, though, and a good Morris Day joke.

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991, dir. Kevin Reynolds)

Returned to England from the Crusades, a nobleman finds his lands taken and himself declared outlaw. Messy big-budget version of the oft-told tale mixing action-adventure, hammy playing and black magic/folk horror in at-times awkward measure. Fun in places though.