The Darkest Dawn (2016, dir. Drew Casson)

A teenager escapes an alien invasion. More developed sequel to Hungerford, this time riffing on 28 Days Later and Heart of Darkness as much as Heinlein’s The Puppetmasters. Still some rough edges, but an improvement over the first instalment.

World War Z (2013, dir. Marc Forster)

A UN investigator tracks a zombie virus to its source. The z-movie as big-budget spectacular; not quite action-adventure, not quite horror. A series of linked set-pieces, and not bad, though not for fans demanding a faithful adaptation of its source novel.

Day of the Dead: Bloodline (2018, dir. Hèctor Hernández Vicens)

A military leader clashes with an idealistic doctor in the aftermath of a zombie outbreak. This second loose remake of Romero’s Day of the Dead adds little but a photogenic cast and some reasonable gore FX among the usual tropes and poor character decisions.

Ravenous [AKA Les Affames] (2017, dir. Robin Autert)

A small band of humans try to survive a zombie outbreak in Quebec. Stylish and at times absurdist zombie flick, borrowing from Cell and from Beckett in equal measure. Character-focused throughout, with something for gore fans and indie drama lovers. Recommended.

Here Alone (2016, dir. Rod Blackhurst)

A woman hides in a forest after the death of her daughter and husband in a zombie outbreak. Low-key and downbeat z-flick which makes the most of its limited resources in focusing on grief and character rather than on splatter.

Attack of the Lederhosen Zombies (2016, dir. Dominik Hartl)

Snowboarders fend off zombies in a ski-lodge. Terrible title, weak jokes, and duff acting aside, this is a tatty-but-endearing one-joke movie which foregrounds gory slapstick and the occasional genuinely inventive visual over logic or story. Passable.