Halloween Kills (2021, David Gordon Green)

In 2018, Michael’s rampage continues: events have links to forty years earlier. The middle part of the new trilogy suffers from a need to keep its leads safe for part three. As a result, there’s little plot: effective and plentiful kills, fan service, and nods to survivor guilt and mob mentality don’t a complete movie make.

Here’s another view.

And here’s the trailer.

The Forever Purge (2021, dir. Everardo Gout)

The purge extended in near-future Texas, a group makes a run for the Mexico border, pursued by murderous vigilantes. While a few changes are rung in the dystopian franchise‘s fifth outing, it lacks the focus of earlier, better instalments, and descends into well-meaning preachiness at times.

Here’s the trailer.

The Devil Below (2021, dir. Bradley Parker)

A young woman leads a party recceing a remote long-abandoned mine being protected by locals. Very straightforward horror flick, uncertain what to do with its premise: not great at all. A decent lead performance helps, though, and old hand Will Patton offers world-weary grizzled support.

Here’s the trailer.

Hammer (2019, dir. Christian Sparkes)

An estranged father and son are forced to work together when a drug deal goes wrong. Smart, lean all-in-one-day indie thriller with as keen a focus on character and relationships as on the narrative’s spiralling complications. Lots to appreciate and enjoy; recommended. Great to see Will Patton in a leading role too.

Halloween (2018, dir. David Gordon Green)

40 years later, Michael Myers escapes to track down Laurie Strode again. Decent-enough and respectful series reboot (ignoring all the sequels), albeit one which feels too restrained. Some awkward storytelling doesn’t help either, one lovely moment and one great child actor aside.

Armageddon (1998, dir. Michael Bay)

A crack team of misfit oil drillers is sent into space to blow up an asteroid on a collision course with Earth. Bombastic basic training/mission action flick with some comic moments and all of the director’s penchant for wearying excess when unrestrained.