Red Hill (2010, dir. Patrick Hughes)

The arrival of a transferred deputy to a remote Australian community coincides with the escape of a vengeful murderer. While the plot elements don’t quite work, this is nevertheless a well-staged and good-looking contemporary Western/horror hybrid, with a couple of mythic touches and a great villain.

Hell on the Border (2019, dir. Wes Miller)

A black bounty hunter is promised a marshal’s badge if he can bring in a notorious criminal. Based on a true story, this Western has good intentions but is a scrappy beast. Some good performances and the presence of solid character actors like Ron Perlman and Frank Grillo are undermined by poor writing and direction, and under-par cinematography.

The Kid (2019, dir. Vincent D’Onofrio)

A brother and sister, on the run from their vengeful uncle, cross paths with both Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid. Deliberately-paced Western focusing on character playing, landscape, and on actorly performances as much as on its narrative approach to an oft-told bit of genre history.

Deadwood [AKA Deadwood: The Movie] (2019, dir. Daniel Minahan)

Over a decade has passed since the events of the TV series, and Swearengen, Bullock and others have to face up to their pasts and their futures. Elegaic return to a splendid unfinished TV show that does the original justice. Recommended.

Black ’47 (2018, dir. Lance Daly)

A posse chases a vengeful ex-soldier across famine-torn Ireland. Vivid and evocative revenge drama, using Western genre tropes to support a specific Irish story with contemporary wider relevance. Some unnecessary and iffy CG mattes aside, this is great stuff.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen)

Six tales of the Old West, each taller than the last. Splendid Western anthology, packed full of quirky moments and character actors, with a few stars plainly having fun. Not exactly commercial, though; Netflix is a good home for this Coen brothers confection.

Hostiles (2017, dir. Scott Cooper)

An embittered US Army veteran is given the task of repatriating a dying Cheyenne chief. Handsome, sombre and occasionally po-faced Western with a straightforward message. Good performances, though not quite the epic it wants to be.

Forty Guns (1957, dir. Sam Fuller)

Three brothers arrive in a Western town dominated by a woman with a gang of forty hired guns. Splendid revision of aspects of the story of the OK Corral gunfight, with a strong female presence and a focus on the possibilities of widescreen visual storytelling.

No Country For Old Men (2007, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen)

After stumbling across the proceeds from a drug deal gone wrong, a Vietnam veteran is pursued by an implacable hitman. Astonishing thriller about violence, randomness and fate, which works also as a contemporary (it’s set in 1980) borderlands Western.

How The West Was Won (1962, dir. Henry Hathaway, John Ford & George Marshall)

The story of US westward expansion, told through one family over four generations. Epic Western (shot in Cinerama) of the old school, a triumph of US exceptionalism. Dated values-wise, but fascinating and fun in equal measure.