Day Shift (2022, dir. JJ Perry)

A down-on-his-luck LA vampire hunter races against time to save his family. Splashy hybrid of horror-comedy and buddy thriller: From Dusk Till Dawn and John Wick are key influences: the plot is an excuse to hang a series of fun fight sequences on. Scott Adkins and Snoop Dogg (it’s that kinda film) pop up for good measure, and there’s even a Hellzapoppin gag.

Here’s the trailer.

The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974, dir. Roy Ward Baker [and Chang Cheh])

In 1904 China, a visiting Van Helsing helps combat a Dracula-led vampiric uprising. The last pic of the Hammer cycle innovates through genre mash-up (and a deal with Shaw Brothers). It’s messy, but fun: martial arts showcasing, twists on undead lore, plus some location spectacle all helps.

Here’s the trailer.

Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972, dir. Alan Gibson)

Dracula seeks revenge on the modern-day Van Helsings. This series reboot revisits plot elements from Taste The Blood Of and … Has Risen but sets them in then-contemporary Chelsea. The swinging London stuff was dated in ’72, but this is still a brisk romp with a time-capsule attraction and some grittier asides.

Here’s the trailer.

Dracula [AKA Horror of Dracula] (1958, dir. Terence Fisher)

Vampire hunters tackle an ancient evil. Innovative, brisk and for-its-time revolutionary version of the gothic horror classic, here telescoped admirably into a pacy visual thriller. Played straight, fluidly directed and still influential. Recommended. Eight sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970, dir. Peter Sasdy)

Three debauched Victorian gentlemen agree to a satanic ritual. Middling series entry (following directly from Dracula Has Risen From The Grave) balancing Stoker and Dennis Wheatley. Slipshod storytelling and a struggle to innovate doesn’t help, though the movie’s enlivened by a decent cast of character actors and some new talent.

Here’s the trailer.

Dark Shadows (2012, dir. Tim Burton)

An ancient vampire is resurrected; he vows to restore the family fortunes. Gothic comedy-horror revival of the 60s TV series. Initially very funny, but soon collapses as there’s not much story, and the film runs out of culture-clash gags. Looks great, though. Minor Burton, alas.

Family Blood (2018, dir. Sonny Mallhi)

A mother with addiction issues is turned into a vampire. Low-key vampirism-as-addiction drama which looks great, but too often mistakes sullenness for seriousness, and which doesn’t invest its characters with much depth or motivation.

Eat Locals (2017, dir. Jason Flemyng)

A vampire gathering is interrupted by an army/cleric hit squad. Slightly ramshackle low budget comedy-horror with a clear debt to Dog Soldiers, this just about gets by on its game cast of familiar faces, plus plenty of ideas, not all of which get a fair shake.

Stake Land II (AKA The Stakelander) (2016, dir. Dan Berk & Robert Olsen)

After his family is killed, the adult Martin seeks out Mister. Autumnal but impressive sequel to Stake Land, this second part is better on atmosphere than on its lean revenge plot, but is watchable nevertheless.

Stake Land (2010, dir. Jim Mickle)

A teen and a grizzled hunter journey across a post-vampire-apocalypse America. An episodic but imaginative spin on the genre, wth plenty of ideas, some clever spins on old tropes, and a fun central performance.