47 Meters Down: Uncaged (2019, dir. Johannes Roberts)

Four schoolfriends are trapped in an underwater ruin. Passable teen-oriented thematic sequel. Doesn’t have the singular purpose of its predecessor, and too much is demanded of an inexperienced cast. No great shakes in the scares department, either, though subgenre fans will have an at least passable time.

Here’s the trailer.

47 Metres Down [AKA 47 Meters Down; Johannes Roberts’ 47 Metres/Meters Down; In The Deep] (2017, dir. Johannes Roberts)

Vacationing sisters who take a shark-viewing excursion become trapped underwater. Straightforward and effective survival thriller with horror elements. Does what it can to explore the boundaries of its premise: a sequel soon followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Underwater (2020, dir. William Ewbank)

A deep underwater drilling platform is compromised; survivors try to escape. Derivative but effective SF/horror piece, taking Alien and sequels as its jumping-off point. Well-designed, with some solid jumpscares and a sturdy lead performance. Pleasingly efficient throughout, if by no means a game-changer.

Deepstar Six (1988, dir. Sean S. Cunningham)

An undersea naval facility disturbs a monstrous sea creature. Slightly tatty Alien clone trying to steal The Abyss‘s thunder at the late 80s box office. A cast of TV faces and some fun-though-budget model and creature effects help pass the time. One great jumpscare, mind you, and some interesting character details in passing.

Leviathan (1989, dir. George Pan Cosmatos)

A deep-sea mining team encounters a sunken Soviet ship harbouring a mutant organism. Cheesy Alien/The Thing hybrid/ripoff, made to piggyback the release of The Abyss. Perfunctory direction and script, but a couple of neat Stan Winston-designed monster moments and a fine cast of character actors offer some entertainment.