Final Destination (2000, dir. James Wong)

After a premonition saves them from an air crash a group of teens are targeted by Death itself. Inventive horror flick, taking the convoluted killing sequence trope from the Omen films and re-inventing it for the Scream generation. Tons of fun, a few neat in-jokes, and clever kills aplenty. The first of a series of five films.

Final Destination 2 (2003, dir. David R Ellis)

Strangers who narrowly miss being killed in a freeway pile-up find they are connected to those who died in the Flight 180 disaster aftermath. A sprightly sequel upping the first movie’s focus on blackly comic convoluted killing mechanisms, as Death seeks to restore order. Lots of fun, and contains maybe the greatest car crash in the movies.

Colors (1988, dir. Dennis Hopper)

A veteran and a rookie struggle to work together while patrolling LA’s gang neighbourhoods. Still-influential drama that tries for nuance while establishing the look and tone of two generations of movies. Worth revisiting, not least for its direction, cinematography, and its Herbie Hancock score.

The Debt Collector (2018, dir. Jesse V. Johnson)

A desperate-for-money martial arts instructor takes a job as a  debt collector. Okay thick ear, with a fight every 5 minutes and some comic moments. Old-school in many ways, and with a tacked-on plot that doesn’t quite work, but reasonable fun for fisticuffs fans.

Final Destination 5 (2011, dir. Steven Quale)

A group of office workers are killed off one by one after surviving a freak accident. Superior fifth instalment of the stunt death franchise, with ingenious kill sequences and a sense of fun throughout, plus a very well-staged plot reversal.