Boss Level (2021, dir. Joe Carnahan)

An ex-soldier caught in a time loop fights to save his wife and child. Slightly wobbly Groundhog Day / Source Code variant, heavy on slapstick kills. Tonally all over the shop, which is a shame. Frank Grillo is as good value as ever, though, and there’s a strong supporting cast, plus some decent action choreography late on.

Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s take.

And here’s the trailer.

Freejack (1992, dir. Geoff Murphy)

A race driver is time-jumped to near-future 2009, where his body has been requisitioned for transplant purposes. Ramshackle chase thriller with SF trappings. Some fun in the casting and in odd moments, but this is nevertheless tatty and derivative: a troubled production, as this was, can leave scar tissue.

Here’s the trailer.

The Tomorrow War (2021, dir. Chris McKay)

A science teacher is recruited to fight a war that won’t happen for thirty years. Overlong, derivative (everything from Saving Private Ryan to The Thing gets pillaged) and at-times clunky SF/horror/war flick. The action is terrific throughout (and worth watching once for that alone), but the movie doesn’t know when to stop.

Here’s the trailer.

Palm Springs (2020, dir. Max Barbakow)

A man is resigned to being stuck in a temporal loop at a wedding. Solid SF/fantasy comedy with sharp edges. Smart playing, a fine soundtrack, and enough diversion from the Groundhog Day template all helps, as does a pleasingly amoral streak. JK Simmons and Dale Dickey are along for the ride.

Here’s the trailer.

Curvature (2017, dir. Diego Hallivis)

A bereaved woman investigates the circumstances surrounding her partner’s suicide, which may be linked to his temporal physics work. Initially-intriguing SF thriller which refocuses midway into something much less compelling. Kudos for not always doing the obvious, but a frustrating watch nevertheless.

Here’s the trailer.

Bill & Ted Face The Music (2020, dir. Dean Parisot)

The now middle-aged Wyld Stallyns have to travel the multiverse to save reality, their daughters, and their marriages. Unnecessary but still welcome threequel, with enough of a spin on the same plot as twice before to pass muster. Everyone’s having fun, and Winter is especially good.

Here’s the trailer.

Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989, dir. Stephen Herek)

A slacker high-school garage band duo are lent a time machine so the future can be saved by their rock music. Affable time travel comedy with likeable leads, some wit and finesse in the writing, and lightness and clarity of purpose throughout. Two sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Tenet (2020, dir. Christopher Nolan)

An agent is recruited to investigate an arms dealer who may have access to technology from the future. Dazzling, confident SF thriller with more than its share of smart ideas. Glossy entertainment of the highest order: sharp suits, modernist architecture, timey-wimey shenanigans. Don’t overthink it: go with the temporal flow. Recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

The Last Sharknado: It’s About Time (2018, dir. Anthony C. Ferrante)

Fin and crew journey through time to prevent the sharknados from ever beginning. The sixth and final instalment of the trash franchise tests the tolerance of the most indulgent fan, though has three good jokes among the dross. A low strike rate, but sometimes you take what you can.

Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor (2013, dir. Nick Hurran)

The Tenth and Eleventh Doctors face their past, personified. Splendid movie-length episode made in 3D and cinema-released to celebrate the show’s 50th anniversary. A witty time-travel adventure typical of its then-showrunner, made with both love and a keen sense of the show’s heritage. Recommended.