The Equalizer 2 (2018, dir. Antoine Fuqua)

McCall vows to take revenge on the rogue CIA element who killed his friend. Clunky sequel that struggles to find meaningful things for its protagonist to do. One of those series entries that has to invent new backstory to make its plot-points stick. Kinda disappointing.

Skyfall (2012, dir. Sam Mendes)

Bond battles a former MI:6 agent intent on revenge on M. Superior series entry with lots to recommend it, not least a back-to-basics siege third act. A couple of wobbly moments (beware the oddly-empty tube car), but apart from those, this is superior genre entertainment.

The Commuter (2018, dir. Jaume Collet-Serra)

A just-sacked salesman is coerced into finding a witness on his train home. Contrived but fun single-location thriller from Neeson/Collet-Serra (their 4th collaboration). Well-stocked with sneaky character actors, and there’s a third-act moment of wonder. Enjoyable tosh.

Another perspective required? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s POV.

Anon (2018, dir. Andrew Niccol)

In the near future, a detective investigates a woman without a data presence. Minimalist thriller typical of its director’s concerns with surveillance. Well-designed, and with plenty of good stuff along the way, but maybe a touch too austere, falling between arthouse and genre piece.

Jack Reacher (2012, dir. Christopher McQuarrie)

Reacher investigates a mass-murder committed by a former sniper. First and better of the Tom Cruise adaptations of the Lee Child books, with a focus on old-school lo-fi tough guy thrills, and on a reasonable mystery backed up with excellent character acting.

Wind River (2017, dir. Taylor Sheridan)

A hunter helps an FBI agent investigate the murder of a young woman. Enthralling snowy contemporary Western, with something to say about grief, the bleakness of reservation life, and life in the mountains, while delivering genre thrills.

Wetlands (2017, dir. Emanuele Della Valle)

An ex-addict cop has a chance at redemption. Autumnal neo-noir with a good cast and some fine ideas and moments, but an overly-busy plot and some excesses muddy the waters. Not uninteresting though.