Sicario 2: Soldado (AKA Sicario 2: Day of the Soldado) (2018, dir. Stefano Sollima)

Graver enlists Alejandro once more; this time to start a war between cartels. A focus on people trafficking rather than drugs second time around; terrifically stylish and well-executed, if flirting with some reactionary ideas.

No Country For Old Men (2007, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen)

After stumbling across the proceeds from a drug deal gone wrong, a Vietnam veteran is pursued by an implacable hitman. Astonishing thriller about violence, randomness and fate, which works also as a contemporary (it’s set in 1980) borderlands Western.

Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation [AKA The Return of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre] (1994, dir. Kim Henkel)

Four students leave their senior prom and get lost in the woods, happening across the Sawyer clan. Again, there’s interesting stuff among the scream and chase stuff, not least an odd wider story, and some smart production design. Patchy, though.

Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III (1990, dir. Jeff Burr)

A young couple and a survivalist fall foul of the Sawyers. Straightforward back-roads bodycount series entry, with the Sawyer family dynamic again the most interesting aspect. Notable for a young Viggo Mortensen in the cast, plus veteran Ken Foree.

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986, dir. Tobe Hooper)

An ambitious DJ and a vengeful sheriff hunt the Sawyer family. Scattershot sequel, foregrounding black comedy, gore effects, and a subversion of Reaganite family values. Gleeful rather than good or scary, it nevertheless has a few startling moments.

Sicario (2015, dir. Denis Villeneuve)

A female FBI agent gets in over her head when she volunteers to liaise with an inter-agency anti-drugs team. Smart, bleak and suspenseful thriller with great performances and some standout sequences. Recommended.

The Lusty Men (1952, dir. Nicholas Ray)

A retired rodeo rider trains another man to ride competitively. Tough-for-its time melodrama with plenty of good second-unit work on location, and a focus on its female protagonist typical of its director. Loads of salty dialogue. Recommended.