The Foreigner (2017, dir Martin Campbell)

A Chinese ex-soldier targets the former IRA boss he holds responsible for his daughter’s death. Enjoyable tho daft flick which struggles to reconcile its dated Troubles backstory with 21st century¬†geriaction revenge concerns. Solid direction, good performances, and some deft stuntwork make this more than watchable.

Stratton (2017, dir. Simon West)

A Special Boat Service operative races against time to prevent a terrorist attack. Utterly secondhand and dull thriller, lacking in decent action, watchable performances, or a script with an iota of originality. Astonishing this got a cinema release, when stronger fare goes straight to download/DVD.

Patriot Games (1992, dir. Phillip Noyce)

Or, Jack Ryan v. bits of the IRA. Awkwardly-conceived thriller which tries to have ‘good’ and ‘bad’ terrorists (this was pre-9/11; the IRA tended to be romanticised in US¬†popculture). Some decent set-pieces, and a picture-postcard view of the UK.

Body of Lies (2008, dir. Ridley Scott)

A CIA operative in the Middle East is caught between conflicting loyalties. Good-looking and well-directed though predictable tale of post-9/11 espionage, with opaque masculine moralities contrasted with a female archetype representing possible redemption.

Unlocked (2017, dir. Michael Apted)

A CIA interrogator uncovers a terrorist conspiracy. Okay London-set thriller with a decent cast and some excellent location work; better at the nuts-and-bolts of tradecraft early in the flick than the last act move into big-stakes tomfoolery.

Imperium (2016, dir. Daniel Ragussis)

A nerdy FBI agent goes undercover to thwart a fascist domestic terrorism plot. Standard will-he-get-found-out scenes and some clumsy storytelling mar this otherwise proficient thriller, which takes some time to explore a spectrum of neo-Nazi subcultures.

Patriots Day (2017, dir. Peter Berg)

Boston cops track the 2013 marathon bombers. Awkwardly-structured, and mechanically sentimental, but an undeniably effective fictionalised reconstruction. Heartfelt, and with a genuinely mesmerising interrogation scene, the film asks some good questions.