Dark Phoenix [AKA X-Men: Dark Phoenix] (2019, dir. Simon Kinberg)

1992: the orphaned young Jean Grey is exposed to an interstellar flare; her energies grow exponentially. Okay-but-formulaic last X-film, suffering in part because of the plot already being used by the film series before. Better than its predecessor Apocalypse, but this is for series completists only, despite solid work from those still under contract.

Avengers: Endgame (2019, dir. Anthony Russo & Joe Russo)

The remaining Avengers plan an elaborate time heist to recover the infinity stones and undo the events of the recent war. Crowd-pleasing sequel/series endpoint that succeeds in narrative closure and fanservice terms. It’s TV by this stage, but impeccably done.

Incredibles 2 (2018, dir. Brad Bird)

Elastigirl works to redeem public perception of superheroes, while Mr Incredible wrestles with baby Jack-Jack’s burgeoning powers. Perhaps overlong and overly-similar to the first film, this is nevertheless expertly-designed and executed family entertainment.

Justice League (2017, dir. Zack Snyder)

After the events of Dawn of Justice, Bruce Wayne assembles a team to combat the new threat of Steppenwolf. Okay series continuation, with a lighter tone; a straightforward plot and a stagey look are distractions from an at-times impressive cast.

Want another perspective? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s view.

Fantastic Four (2015, dir. Josh Trank)

Five young scientists gain superpowers after opening an interdimensional portal. Unnecessary reboot/origin story which takes an age to get going and doesn’t really have a plot. A strong and well-chosen (though hardly teenage) cast wasted on rote material and some variable FX.

Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 (2017, dir. James Gunn)

Peter Quill meets his father. Somewhat underpowered sequel, relying on soap operatics and the banter between crewmates plus audience goodwill to mask a weak narrative. Some fun while it’s on, but this is no great shakes; a disappointment, really.

Logan (2017, dir. James Mangold)

2029. An aging Logan and a dying Xavier commit to one last stand. Overlong and clunky in parts, this is nevertheless an elegiac and fittingly serious send-off, riffing on time-worn western and road movie themes.