Pet Sematary (2019, dir. Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer)

A doctor and family settle in a New England community with a secret. Okay second adaptation of the Stephen King novel, itself an extended riff on WW Jacobs’ “The Monkey’s Paw”. Adds some folk horror moments and enough third act story alterations to differentiate it sufficiently from the serviceable 1989 movie version.

Creepshow 2 (1987, dir. Michael Gornick)

Three adaptations of Stephen King short stories: “Old Chief Woodenhead”, “The Raft” and “The Hitchhiker”. Cut-price anthology sequel that short-changes the viewer (there were five tales in Part 1), making up in rubbery gore for what the yarns lack in comedy and chills. A couple of oddly-effective moments, but that’s about it.

It: Chapter Two (2019, dir. Andy Muschetti)

The now-adult Losers’ Club return to Derry to face Pennywise again 27 years later. Oddly baggy second half; the adults don’t get enough attention, and the resolution still doesn’t work. Pennywise turns out to be a lot less scary when facing down grownups. Gives the impression there’s a better miniseries-length edit of the movies somewhere.

Pet Semetery (2019, Dir. Kevin Kölsch, Dennis Widmyer)

A family discover a mysterious burial ground with hidden powers of reanimation. A well adapted movie which ably captures the horrific nastiness from the novel and plays nothing for laughs. Grim enough for a classic ‘bleak-end’ and worth your time!

Trucks (1997, dir. Chris Thomson)

Vehicles come alive, terrorising travellers hiding out in a rural diner. TV movie version of the same Stephen King short that inspired Maximum Overdrive, with odd gore scenes inserted to make it a horror for international cinema release. Perfunctory.

It [AKA It: Chapter One](2017, dir. Andy Muschietti)

A gang of misfit teens battle a supernatural beast which feasts on their hometown once a generation. Excellent version of the ‘then’ portion of the Stephen King novel (1950s in the book, now 1989), with good performances and effective scares all round. Recommended.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s take.

The Dark Tower (2017, dir. Nikolaj Arcel)

A fatherless boy is hunted as both the potential saviour and destructor of the multiverse. Impressively-designed and well shot, this is nevertheless an oddly perfunctory and rushed movie, cherrypicking 90 minutes of action from the Stephen King fantasy cycle.

Fancy another point of view? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s review.