Pet Semetery (2019, Dir. Kevin Kölsch, Dennis Widmyer)

A family discover a mysterious burial ground with hidden powers of reanimation. A well adapted movie which ably captures the horrific nastiness from the novel and plays nothing for laughs. Grim enough for a classic ‘bleak-end’ and worth your time!

Trucks (1997, dir. Chris Thomson)

Vehicles come alive, terrorising travellers hiding out in a rural diner. TV movie version of the same Stephen King short that inspired Maximum Overdrive, with odd gore scenes inserted to make it a horror for international cinema release. Perfunctory.

It [AKA It: Chapter One](2017, dir. Andy Muschietti)

A gang of misfit teens battle a supernatural beast which feasts on their hometown once a generation. Excellent version of the ‘then’ portion of the Stephen King novel (1950s in the book, now 1989), with good performances and effective scares all round. Recommended.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s take.

The Dark Tower (2017, dir. Nikolaj Arcel)

A fatherless boy is hunted as both the potential saviour and destructor of the multiverse. Impressively-designed and well shot, this is nevertheless an oddly perfunctory and rushed movie, cherrypicking 90 minutes of action from the Stephen King fantasy cycle.

Fancy another point of view? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s review.

1922 (2017, dir. Zak Hilditch)

A farmer is driven mad by a selfish decision. Period horror-drama based on a Stephen King novella. Anchored by a great performance from Thomas Jane and a feeling of grim inevitability. No surprises, but a well-mounted production.

Gerald’s Game (2017, dir. Mike Flanagan)

When a sex game goes wrong, a woman has to fight her demons. Solid adaptation of the Stephen King novel which, though it fumbles its last revelation, is well-acted and which cinematically sustains its potentially unfilmable premise.