Deadpool 2 (2018, dir. David Leitch)

After the death of his girlfriend, Deadpool finds redemption in protecting a young mutant. Confident sequel with the same approach as before, mixing cartoony violence, baroque language and metatextual gags.

The Huntsman: Winter’s War (2016, dir. Cedric Nicolas-Troyan)

Sidequel to 2012’s Snow White and the Huntsman, minus the first film’s lead. Oddball attempt to craft a continuation; good casting in depth helps a bit, but the story’s a secondhand grab-bag of old tales that have been better retold by others.

2012 (2009, dir. Roland Emmerich)

A geological event threatens global disaster. Another of Emmerich’s gently-satirical throw-em-to-the-lions iconoclastic pictures, this time playing with Mayan prophecies and CG tectonic plates shifting. Fun if you go with it.

Bleed For This (2016, dir. Ben Younger)

Biopic of Vinny Pazienza, who overcame a broken neck to return to championship-standard boxing. A straightforward but immersive triumph-over-adversity story from the headlines, with great work from a talented cast, especially Ciaran Hinds and Aaron Eckhart.

Army of One (2016, dir. Larry Charles)

A handyman believes he’s on a mission from God to kill Osama Bin Laden. Shrill semi-improvised comedy based on a true story, with Nicolas Cage turning in an unrestrained performance. Inevitably, a couple of good moments, but there’s a lot of shouting to sit through.

Margin Call (2011, dir. JC Chandor)

A night and a day in a Wall Street company going under at the start of the financial crisis. Smart little boardroom thriller with a keen ensemble cast working well together. Makes you care about a bunch of suits and their shifty ways with numbers.

Raging Bull (1980, dir. Martin Scorsese)

Biopic of Italian-American boxer Jake LaMotta. Unflinching warts-and-all account of the turbulent life and times of the New York middleweight, based on LaMotta’s autobiography. One of Scorsese’s finest, and thus one of the greatest American films.