Halloween: Resurrection (2002, dir. Rick Rosenthal)

Students spend Halloween night in the Myers house as part of a live-streamed event. None-more-early-00s direct sequel to H20. While the early internet/surveillance stuff is now interesting/nostalgic, this is poor even by franchise standards: one kill, though, references Peeping Tom.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween H20: Twenty Years Later (1998, dir. Steve Miner)

Two decades after the original killings Laurie Strode must face Michael again. Ignoring all but parts 1 and 2, this post-Scream series revival is a competent, well-produced (and brisk) entry with knowing touches, though it struggles to balance teen soap operatics with a more interesting story of survivor guilt, alcoholism and catharsis.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988, dir. Dwight H Little)

A decade after the events of Parts 1 and 2, Michael Myers escapes again, and returns to Haddonfield once more. Contrived series continuation that, despite some good moments and stunt work, has to rely on soap operatics for a story engine. Still, fun for fans, plus the ending has some verve.

Here’s the trailer.

Halloween II (1981, dir. Rick Rosenthal)

A young woman continues to be stalked by an implacable killer. Straightforward slasher sequel (albeit with some very effective moments) continuing directly from the superior 1978 original. Has to work hard to justify itself: soap and mythic elements intrude in lieu of story/that much for Jamie Lee Curtis to do.

Here’s the trailer.

Final Exam (1981, dir. Jimmy Huston)

A motiveless killer attacks a campus at end of semester. Curious character-focused Halloween-derived slasher pic with strong elements (it’s well-shot, builds to a decent climax, the baddie is great) but which struggles to fill its running time, substituting frat boy hijinks for a genre plot. Not uninteresting though.

Here’s the trailer.

Urban Legends: Final Cut [AKA Urban Legend 2; Urban Legends: The Final Cut] (2000, dir. John Ottman)

A serial killer stalks a group of film students. Tenuous (and only vaguely urban legend-ish) sequel that has fun moments and a couple of neat movie shout-outs, but which is unscary, not gory, is illogical, and has few characters to root for. The whodunnit angle gets lost in the process. A third movie followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Urban Legend (1998, dir. Jamie Blanks)

A serial killer stalks a campus, the killings inspired by urban legends. Generally satisfactory self-aware post-Scream whodunnit/slasher hybrid with pretensions to John Carpenter, though light on scares and grue, and clumsy in terms of representation. Fun support from stalwarts Robert Englund, Brad Dourif and Julian Ritchings helps. Two sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Friday the 13th (2009, dir. Marcus Nispel)

Two groups of students spend weekends by a deserted summer camp; murders ensue. Clunky attempted series reboot/sidequel with perfunctory handling, and a focus on hunk/hottie/stoner soap operatics rather than story or logic. Not much good, to be honest.

Here’s the trailer.

Sorority Row (2009, dir. Stewart Hendler)

Eight months after the prank-related killing of a fellow student, those involved are each targeted for murder. Glossy loose remake of The House on Sorority Row, with a focus as much on hotties and hunks as much as the at-times inventive deaths and whodunnit stuff. Carrie Fisher is fun in support.

Here’s the trailer.

The House on Sorority Row [AKA House of Evil] (1983, dir. Mark Rosman)

After a revenge prank leads to a death, seven female students are killed off during a end-of-year party. Its awkward set-up notwithstanding, this is a superior subgenre example, building to a delirious third act that’s half-Hitchcock and half-Argento. Lots of fun for fans. An eventual remake followed.

Here’s the trailer.