You’ve Got Mail (1998, dir. Nora Ephron)

An independent bookshop owner and a corporate bookstore exec fall in love pseudonymously by email. Slick update of (among others) Lubitsch’s The Shop Around The Corner, though now a 90s period piece itself in respect of its tech, its fascination with bricks-and-mortar retail, and some of its assumptions.

The Shape of Water (2017, dir. Guillermo del Toro)

A mute cleaner falls in love with a humanoid aquatic creature being held in a government research laboratory. Dazzlingly confident romantic fantasy with SF/horror touches. Amelie meets The Creature From The Black Lagoon with a bit of Little Voice. Highly recommended.

Downsizing (2017, dir. Alexander Payne)

A man is forced to re-evaluate his life after volunteering to be miniaturised. Quirky fantasy which can’t work out if it’s social satire, science fiction, or romance, but has a go at all three. Defiantly odd, though, which is no bad thing.

Jules et Jim (1962, dir. Francois Truffaut)

Two decades (pre- and post-WWI)in the lives of two men and the woman they both love. Peerless example of the French New Wave; its impact dulled by time perhaps inevitably, but nevertheless a fascinating movie crammed with daring thematic and technical ideas.

2.22 (2017, dir. Paul Currie)

An air traffic controller starts to believe that the same events are repeating themselves as a warning from the past. A love story with bits of Groundhog Day, Pushing Tin and 12 Monkeys thrown in; the complex backstory and the resolution don’t work.

Passengers (2016, dir. Morten Tyldum)

A deep-space vessel malfunctions; a passenger wakes from cryosleep 90 years early. Odd SF flick which initially plays interestingly with The Shining in space, only to default to creepy romance mode which doesn’t work at all; Act 3 shows evidence of much surgery.

Another opinion? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s thoughts.