Brief Encounter (1945, dir. David Lean)

Two otherwise-married people consider an affair. Deft romantic drama with its tongue partially in cheek in places; flirtations with film noir and German expressionism as well as with slice-of-life across-the-classes melodramatics.

You’ve Got Mail (1998, dir. Nora Ephron)

An independent bookshop owner and a corporate bookstore exec fall in love pseudonymously by email. Slick update of (among others) Lubitsch’s The Shop Around The Corner, though now a 90s period piece itself in respect of its tech, its fascination with bricks-and-mortar retail, and some of its assumptions.

The Shape of Water (2017, dir. Guillermo del Toro)

A mute cleaner falls in love with a humanoid aquatic creature being held in a government research laboratory. Dazzlingly confident romantic fantasy with SF/horror touches. Amelie meets The Creature From The Black Lagoon with a bit of Little Voice. Highly recommended.

Downsizing (2017, dir. Alexander Payne)

A man is forced to re-evaluate his life after volunteering to be miniaturised. Quirky fantasy which can’t work out if it’s social satire, science fiction, or romance, but has a go at all three. Defiantly odd, though, which is no bad thing.

Jules et Jim (1962, dir. Francois Truffaut)

Two decades (pre- and post-WWI)in the lives of two men and the woman they both love. Peerless example of the French New Wave; its impact dulled by time perhaps inevitably, but nevertheless a fascinating movie crammed with daring thematic and technical ideas.

2.22 (2017, dir. Paul Currie)

An air traffic controller starts to believe that the same events are repeating themselves as a warning from the past. A love story with bits of Groundhog Day, Pushing Tin and 12 Monkeys thrown in; the complex backstory and the resolution don’t work.