Hellboy (2019, dir. Neil Marshall)

Hellboy battles an ancient sorceress from Arthurian legend. Famously-troubled shooting and post-production bedevilled this fantasy horror series reboot, which as a consequence is all over the place. Some good stuff, but its awkward storytelling is patched with flashbacks, dubbed dialogue, variable FX, overlength; the works. A shame.

Halloween (2018, dir. David Gordon Green)

40 years later, Michael Myers escapes to track down Laurie Strode again. Decent-enough and respectful series reboot (ignoring all the sequels), albeit one which feels too restrained. Some awkward storytelling doesn’t help either, one lovely moment and one great child actor aside.

Star Trek (2009, dir. JJ Abrams)

The Enterprise crew assembles and fights a renegade Romulan across two generations. Slick and funny on the surface, though with an awkward backstory (alt-timelines and time-travel), this franchise reboot delivers acceptably with a well-cast crew.

Fantastic Four (2015, dir. Josh Trank)

Five young scientists gain superpowers after opening an interdimensional portal. Unnecessary reboot/origin story which takes an age to get going and doesn’t really have a plot. A strong and well-chosen (though hardly teenage) cast wasted on rote material and some variable FX.

Blair Witch (2016, dir. Adam Wingard)

20 years on, a young man and friends make a documentary about the events of The Blair Witch Project. Contrivances are needed to get the movie going, but the rest of the film is effective-enough found-footage jumpscare material in this sequel/reboot.

Vacation (2015, dir. John Francis Daley & Jonathan Goldstein)

The next generation of Griswolds go to Walley World. Sequel/reboot to the 80s Chevy Chase flicks; an okay episodic gross-out road movie of the old school. Inevitably hit-and-miss, but some genuinely funny moments.

Independence Day: Resurgence (2016, dir. Roland Emmerich)

20 years after Independence Day, the aliens return. Sequel/reprise of the 1996 original, taking a lighter, space operatic tone. ID4:R works because it plays as B-movie fodder, and is less interested in plausibility than in creating fun moments.