Alita: Battle Angel (2019, dir. Robert Rodriguez)

In a post-apocalyptic world, a reactivated cyborg finds she has advanced military capabilities. Generally solid though straightforward action-adventure, with manga and cyberpunk influences. Slightly hobbled by an excess of backstory and by awkward reliance on green screen, but well-designed, with some genuine imagination on display.

Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, dir. George Miller & George Ogilvy)

Max Rockatansky encounters a fledgeling civilisation in the desert. The third (though chronologically fourth, after Fury Road) Mad Max flick is glossier, talkier and generally lighter than its predecessors, but nevertheless works as a hugely detailed action fantasy riffing on Peter Pan and Riddley Walker while delivering a fantastic chase sequence.

I Am Mother (2019, dir. Grant Sputore)

A girl is raised by an android in an underground bunker as part of an Earth repopulation project. Well-designed and acted SF that sustains itself for an hour, but which doesn’t have the nous to engineer a third act; ultimately frustrating, even if there are many pleasures along the way.

The Silence (2019, dir. John R Leonetti)

After a swarm of ravenous creatures who hunt by sound is released, a family runs to stay alive. Patchy road movie/horror hybrid from the Tim Lebbon novel. Comes across – a touch unfairly – as an opportunistic grab-bag of bits from Pitch Black / The Birds / Straw Dogs and the more recent Bird Box / A Quiet Place.

The Last Days [AKA Los Ultimas Dias](2014, dir. David Pastor & Alex Pastor)

After an apocalyptic event, two mismatched co-workers battle across Barcelona’s tunnel system to find their families. Deft and imaginative thriller, with an emphasis on character and humanity as much as on action. Plenty of good stuff to be found here. Recommended.

A Quiet Place (2018, dir. John Krasinski)

A family hides in silence from marauding sound-sensitive monsters. Smart post-apocalyptic siege movie, maximising the potential of its gotta-keep-quiet premise, with effective shocks, good performances and a focus on suspense throughout.

Want another review? Here’s Xussia’s take.

Stephanie (2017, dir. Akiva Goldsman)

After an unspecified apocalypse, a young girl is left home alone. Low-key but unsettling jumpscare pic with some decent sequences, a startling central performance (especially early in the film) and a keen sense of maximising its modest ambitions.