Luca (2021, dir. Enrico Casarosa)

An Italian mer-boy swims away from his boring undersea life to the 1950s surface, where he meets an exciting new friend. Sunny but slight animated adventure revisiting ideas done much better by Pixar elsewhere. Still, it looks great, there’s a lovely Sacha Baron Cohen voice cameo, and there’s openness to a gay reading of the central relationship, which is an interesting element.

Here’s the trailer.

Onward (2020, dir. Dan Scanlon)

Mismatched teen brothers in a post-magic fantasy land embark on a quest to communicate with their long-dead father. Straightforward relationship comedy/road movie with plenty of fun detail and some great animation, even if there aren’t any real surprises along the way.

Here’s the trailer.

Cars (2006, dir. John Lasseter [and Joe Ranft])

An arrogant Nascar racer is stranded in a small town off Route 66 where he/it learns some life lessons. Conceptually-weird riff on Doc Hollywood (the vehicular universe makes little sense) though with some good gags, voice performances, and design elements. Two direct sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Toy Story 4 (2019, dir. Josh Cooley)

Woody has to protect Bonnie’s new favourite toy, a figure made from a spork and art supplies. Contrived but watchable fourth instalment. Looks great, has some interestingly dark moments, a fine chase, and is funny throughout, but is an unnecessary coda to the series rather than a required conclusion.

Toy Story 3 (2010, dir. Lee Unkrich)

Woody, Buzz and the others are donated to a nursery when Andy leaves home for college. The franchise goes for a fascinating prison break twist in its story focus, while both pulling on heartstrings and getting good laughs. Recommended.

Coco (2017, dir. Lee Unkrich & Adrian Molina)

A boy desperate to become a musician finds himself trapped in the afterlife. Sprightly quest narrative drawing on Mexican folklore; superficial similarity to The Book of Life dampens its impact, though this is a decent Pixar effort in its own right.

Incredibles 2 (2018, dir. Brad Bird)

Elastigirl works to redeem public perception of superheroes, while Mr Incredible wrestles with baby Jack-Jack’s burgeoning powers. Perhaps overlong and overly-similar to the first film, this is nevertheless expertly-designed and executed family entertainment.

Cars 3 (2017, dir. Brian Fee)

The now-veteran racer Lightning McQueen has one last chance to prove he’s still competitive. Perhaps the best in the trilogy of Pixar’s least likeable franchise, this is a good-looking cartoon with a couple of laughs and a bit of heart.

Another POV? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s review.

Wall-E (2008, dir. Andrew Stanton)

A beat-up robot falls in love with a sleek new model. Superior SF comedy/romance from Pixar; the last hour is knockabout fun with an environmental/healthy living message, but the first 30 minutes is a sublime silent (apart from music from Hello, Dolly! of all things) movie of its own.

Finding Dory (2016, dir. Andrew Stanton & Angus MacLane)

Forgetful Dory goes on an epic journey when she remembers her parents. Gorgeous visuals and packed with gags, even if the short-term amnesia jokes are overloaded. A decent though unsurprising sequel with a scene-stealing octopus and Sigourney Weaver.